Sacro Monte di Ossuccio

Ossuccio, Italy

The Sacro Monte di Ossuccio is one of the nine sacri monti ('Sacred Mountains' of Piedmont and Lombardy, series of nine calvaries or groups of chapels and other architectural features ) in the Italian regions of Lombardy and Piedmont, in northern Italy, which were inscribed on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 2003.

The devotional complex is located on a prealpine crag some 200 metres above the western shore Lake Como, facing Isola Comacina and some 25 km from the city of Como. Surrounded by olive groves and woodland, it is quite isolated from other buildings. The fourteen chapels, constructed between 1635 and 1710 in the typical Baroque style reflecting the Counter Reformation ethos of the sacri monti movement, are joined by a path which leads up to a pre-existing sanctuary of 1532 placed on the summit and dedicated to La Beata Vergine del Soccorso.

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Founded: 1635-1710
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wireko Sika-Danta Ohenenana (4 years ago)
Wonderful place to take a walk while praying
Benoit Gevry (5 years ago)
Very nice view when you get to the main chapel. The ride there can be difficult for some people. Going there with kids would be an adventure!! It’s a bit hard to see what is inside the chapel on the ascent because it’s a bit dark. The main chapel is fairly small but very beautiful. Again, the main purpose of this ride is to get a nice panoramic view of lake Como. You can see the city of Bellagio from there.
Ignazio Mottola (7 years ago)
A stroll into the spirituality of the ancient catholic culture in stunning landscape scenarios
Sebastian W (7 years ago)
Worth the long hike. Terrific views and lovely Italian atmosphere. Look out for hidden treasures along the path.
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