Bevilacqua Castle

Bevilacqua, Italy

Bevilacqua Castle is considered one of the finest examples of its kind on Veronese territory. It was erected in 1336. Guglielmo Bevilacqua and his son, Francesco, were both commissioned by the Della Scala (Lords of Verona) to erect it. Originally erected for purely military purposes, the castle was damaged during the period of League of Cambrai and lost its strategic importance during the reign of the Venetian Republic.

In 1532 the famous architect Michele Sanmicheli transformed it into a country-house. The castle was burnt by the Austrians in 1848, and its subsequent restoration added the neo-gothic elements to the structure visible today, including the battlements.

During the Second World War it became a German Military outpost, before being handed over to the salesian Fathers up to 1966, the year in which it caught fire once more, before being sold to private investors. Thanks to careful restoration the castle has regained its former splendour and can be visited throughout the year.

Bevilacqua castle is now the backdrop for plays, concerts and suggestive Medieval Pageants such as the Medieval Spring and New Year Festival. It also houses a restaurant and a renowned banqueting hall and conference centre which offers every modern facility in a setting steeped in tradition and history.

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Details

Founded: 1336
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.tourism.verona.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Dainov (4 months ago)
Personnel, castle, room, restaurant - everything was perfect and excellent!
Erinn Matesi (5 months ago)
Beautiful castle, delightful to stay in! The escape room was very fun and doable even without speaking much Italian. The staff is very friendly and helpful. Make sure to eat dinner here!
Maé Ischer-Galitch (6 months ago)
The castle is simply breathtaking. We had an amazing stay there. We also had dinner and the waiter was very kind and helpful. The food was delicious and not too expensive. The room we stayed in was exactly like the online pictures. This place is truly worth a visit.
Tanja Collavo (7 months ago)
We had our wedding there and also stayed for two nights afterwards. It was all absolutely perfect! All the staff, and in particular Anna Iseppi, were great, attentive to details and extremely responsive to all our requests. The room was lovely, it really felt like being royalty and going back in time. The breakfast was one of the best we had in our many travels. Would absolutely recommend both for a wedding and for a short stay!
Marco Franceschi (9 months ago)
Great venue for our wedding. Everyone loved it. Anna gave us loads of tips and helped us as we planned the wedding. On the day Renzo and the stuff were great. Quality of the food as well as the service was incredible. The room on the tower where we slept was very spacious and had a killer view on the castle.
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