Bevilacqua Castle

Bevilacqua, Italy

Bevilacqua Castle is considered one of the finest examples of its kind on Veronese territory. It was erected in 1336. Guglielmo Bevilacqua and his son, Francesco, were both commissioned by the Della Scala (Lords of Verona) to erect it. Originally erected for purely military purposes, the castle was damaged during the period of League of Cambrai and lost its strategic importance during the reign of the Venetian Republic.

In 1532 the famous architect Michele Sanmicheli transformed it into a country-house. The castle was burnt by the Austrians in 1848, and its subsequent restoration added the neo-gothic elements to the structure visible today, including the battlements.

During the Second World War it became a German Military outpost, before being handed over to the salesian Fathers up to 1966, the year in which it caught fire once more, before being sold to private investors. Thanks to careful restoration the castle has regained its former splendour and can be visited throughout the year.

Bevilacqua castle is now the backdrop for plays, concerts and suggestive Medieval Pageants such as the Medieval Spring and New Year Festival. It also houses a restaurant and a renowned banqueting hall and conference centre which offers every modern facility in a setting steeped in tradition and history.

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Details

Founded: 1336
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.tourism.verona.it

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lucia B. (19 months ago)
Un albergo di sicuro charme. Fantastico il giardino pensile.
Giuliano Peloso (21 months ago)
Luogo molto originale e bello, cena diversa dal solito
Luca Moreale (2 years ago)
Wonderful structure: it really brings you back on past centuries atmospheres! I loved it!!
Paolo Baldi (3 years ago)
Bellissimo
simona missaglia (3 years ago)
Si tutto molto bello ,banchetto di nozze gestito abbastanza bene qualche pecca nelle persone che lo servivano
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