Vatopedi Monastery

Mount Athos, Greece

The Holy and Great Monastery of Vatopedi on Mount Athos was built during the second half of the 10th century by three monks, Athanasius, Nicholas, and Antonius, from Adrianople, who were disciples of Athanasius the Athonite.

From then onwards, several buildings have been constructed, most of them were built during the Byzantine period and during the 18th and 19th centuries when the monastery reached its highest peak.

Vatopedi features numerous wings, towers, etc. The katholikon (main church) was built in the tenth century, and is dedicated to the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, in accordance with the Athonite architecture. Samples of Byzantine mosaics remain, some of which were retouched in the 12th century and in 1312. Nineteen smaller chapels in addition to the katholikon lie within and outside the boundaries of the monastery. Five are in the katholikon. These of the Saint Nicholas and Saint Demetrios lie left and right of the eso-narthex, and the chapel of the Virgin of Consolation. In the monastery are the chapels of the Holy Girdle and of the Saints Kosmas and Damian.

More than 120 monks live in the monastery today, where extensive construction projects are underway to restore the larger buildings.

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Mount Athos, Greece
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Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

minodora vasile (2 years ago)
I really love this place! WONDERFUL!!!
M Kanev (2 years ago)
Extremely beautiful, peaceful and full of Christian spirit. It's one place every orthodox Christian should visit.
John Demetriou (3 years ago)
It's basically a four star hotel. Everything you want is available. It's also a monastery to visit. The church inside is beuatiful. Lots of gold and other artifacts. There is also a sacristy (museum) which includes a few ancient artifacts as well. If you are going to stay you will have all amenities. Two meals a day, wine, fruit greek coffee. But all under their schedule obviously
Eleutherios Abramidis (3 years ago)
Excellent Hospitality at the most amazing Monastery!
tuma (3 years ago)
A very spiritual place which relaxes the body and soul and the monks are very very spiritual and they help you with whatever you need and answer all questions regarding Christianity
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