Leper’s Tower

Aosta, Italy

The Leper’s Tower was built on the ruins of an ancient Roman tower and was originally known as the Friour Tower, after the family that lived there. This family, whose name was mentioned for the first time in 1191, also occupied the Ports Decumana, now abandoned.

After several changes of ownership, it was bought by the Order of Saint-Maurice in 1773 and was incorporated into a hospice of charity founded by Jean-Boniface Festaz. The current name derives from the fact that a leper named Pierre Bernard Guasco, a native of Oneglia was imprisoned there from 1773 to 1803. This story inspired Lepers of the city of Aosta, a story written by Xavier de Maistre, published in 1811.

In 1890, the tower was restored. Today it belongs to the Autonomous Region of Aosta Valley, which holds exhibitions at the site.

The Leper’s Tower was founded on a Roman tower whose foundations were excavated in the nineteenth century. A medieval tower was built on the site in the 15th century.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Cleary (2 years ago)
Doors were locked. No hours posted.
Fortunato Barbaro (2 years ago)
È un po' trascurata.
antonio cranchi (2 years ago)
Da visitare molto interessante a chi piace la storia
Olexa Onyshchenko (3 years ago)
Nice tower and place around. But don't expect too much:)
Pietro Di Paolo (3 years ago)
Splendido luogo di raccordo tra passato e presente. L'atmosfera magica di questo pezzo di città racchiude un'aurea speciale. Luogo ideale per rilassarsi senza dover uscire dalla città.
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