Beethoven House

Bonn, Germany

The Beethoven House in Bonn is a memorial site, museum and cultural institution serving various purposes. Founded in 1889 by the Beethoven-Haus association, it studies the life and work of composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

The centrepiece of the Beethoven-Haus is Beethoven's birthplace at Bonngasse 20. This building houses the museum. The neighbouring buildings (Bonngasse 18 and 24 to 26) accommodate a research centre (Beethoven archive) comprising a collection, a library and publishing house, and a chamber music hall. Here, music lovers and experts from all over the world can meet and share their ideas. The Beethoven-Haus is financed by the Beethoven-Haus association and by means of public funds.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1889
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marianna Papakonstantinou (10 months ago)
Worth visiting for classical music and local history lovers. You can' t understand a word unless you know good Deutsch, must rent audio guides available at the front desk.
Da Wa (10 months ago)
This is a place of great historical significance which we should treasure for future generations. The house is original and so small and old. But they have added next door some modern elements to enhance the experience. The building is in the middle of Bonn and so close to restaurants and other entertainment.
Sara Gomes (10 months ago)
Well can say was there seen it! But really it’s just his house and a bunch of furniture and instruments. Maybe more interesting if you speak German, but for the non speaking, like myself, a bit boring. The interactive concert in the basement is the best part, but a little too long, I think it really needs a look into to make it a lot more appealing.
Michael Thompson (11 months ago)
Very good indeed. Some really fascinating exhibits. Just wish there were more detailed descriptions for some of the exhibits in languages other than Dutch.
Louise Takata (12 months ago)
The building makes for a nice little walk around to see Beethoven’s instruments, diaries and portraits of his family. It was a shame that all the panels were in German only, however. The 3D interactive opera also made for interesting, yet now quite outdated viewing. €4.50 per student ticket is a little steep for anyone but big Beethoven fans, I think.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.