The Bonn Minster (Bonner Münster) is one of Germany's oldest churches, having been built between the 11th and 13th centuries. At one point the church served as the cathedral for the Archbishopric of Cologne.

Castra Bonnensia was a fortress on the site of current Bonn built by the Romans in the 1st century AD. It survived the breakup of the Roman Empire as a civilian settlement, and in the 9th century it became the Frankish town of Bonnburg.

Around 235 AD, two Christian Roman soldiers stationed in Castra Bonnensia, Cassius and Florentius, were martyred for their faith. Tradition has it that a small memorial shrine was built over their graves in the 4th century by St. Helen, mother of Constantine. There is no surviving evidence of this first structure, but archaeological excavations have shown that the basilica stands on the site of a Roman temple and necropolis.

The original memorial hall was expanded into a larger church in the 6th and 7th centuries, and many people were buried near the martyrs inside and outside the building. Further extensions were carried out in the 8th century.

Around 1050 the church was demolished and construction began on the present Romanesque building, which dates from the 11th to 13th centuries. By the end of this period Bonn had grown in importance, becoming the capital of the Electorate and Archbishopric of Cologne, which was then a sovereign state. The new basilica appeared in the city's coat of arms. In 1643, Cassius and Florentius were officially declared the patron saints of the city of Bonn.

The basilica suffered significant damage in 1583-89, 1689, and in World War II, but each time it was fully restored. In 1956, the Bonner Münster was granted the status of Papal Minor Basilica.

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Address

Gangolfstraße 14, Bonn, Germany
See all sites in Bonn

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ronald Werner (6 months ago)
Beautiful church!
Kawsar ul hoq (9 months ago)
It's the largest cathedral here in Bonn. It looks spectacular both from distance and from inside the cathedral. It's more than 200 hundred years old. Renovation work has been done several times and yet.
Mohammed Alzoubi (9 months ago)
Nice Place, I loved it
David Smith (11 months ago)
Beautiful church in the centre of Bonn, a stone's throw from the main train station. Unfortunately it's currently undergoing a three-year restoration, so can only be admired from outside.
Pno Ens (2 years ago)
Good starting point when visiting Bonn! Always filled with pedestrians and tourists. The famous Beethoven statue was erected mainly by the sponsoring Franz Liszt at Beethoven’s 75th birthday.
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