Schloss Drachenburg

Königswinter, Germany

Schloss Drachenburg is a private villa in palace style constructed in the late 19th century. It was completed in only two years (1882–84) on the Drachenfels hill in Königswinter, a German town on the Rhine near the city of Bonn. Baron Stephan von Sarter (1833–1902), a broker and banker, planned to live there, but never did.

Today the Palace is in the possession of the State Foundation of North Rhine-Westphalia.

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Details

Founded: 1882-1884
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amit Vaidya (9 months ago)
We have been to this castle twice. One during the spring and second time during winter. During the initial period of the year, they light the whole castle and its just beauty. Its cold but its worth visiting it during that time.
Corey Schue (10 months ago)
For the price, a fantastic piece of history to check out. We brought our four year old and there was plenty for them to see and do. The grounds and building are very well kept and accessible. There are tons of nature trails and paths... Just so much to see. €14 for our family was a great value.
Divina Gracia Baclig (10 months ago)
It was first time to encounter a real life castle so I was super awestruck. I've only seen castles in storybooks so I was super excited when I saw Drachenfels. My German friend told me that it was just a cottage compared to the castles in Munich but still I was super impressed. Besides the beautiful structure, the grounds are well maintained.
Hawkin Slusarski (11 months ago)
An amazing castle with a restaurant garden just below. Amazing views of the river, an extraordinary hike through the woods - if you're willing to make the trip - and an awe-inspiring interior. A funicular railway can transport you for ~€8-€12 and access is ~€10, but discounts are available.
Biser Yordanov (11 months ago)
One of my favourite castles in Germany. As we live nearby I‘m coming often here and sometimes it feels like I‘m visiting a good friend in another time. It will take way too much time and words to describe every beautiful thing and aspect of being here. So I can only say: If you are nearby and haven’t seen it- do it. Be sure also to check the ruins a little further upwards.
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