Schloss Drachenburg

Königswinter, Germany

Schloss Drachenburg is a private villa in palace style constructed in the late 19th century. It was completed in only two years (1882–84) on the Drachenfels hill in Königswinter, a German town on the Rhine near the city of Bonn. Baron Stephan von Sarter (1833–1902), a broker and banker, planned to live there, but never did.

Today the Palace is in the possession of the State Foundation of North Rhine-Westphalia.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1882-1884
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amit Vaidya (12 months ago)
We have been to this castle twice. One during the spring and second time during winter. During the initial period of the year, they light the whole castle and its just beauty. Its cold but its worth visiting it during that time.
Corey Schue (13 months ago)
For the price, a fantastic piece of history to check out. We brought our four year old and there was plenty for them to see and do. The grounds and building are very well kept and accessible. There are tons of nature trails and paths... Just so much to see. €14 for our family was a great value.
Divina Gracia Baclig (13 months ago)
It was first time to encounter a real life castle so I was super awestruck. I've only seen castles in storybooks so I was super excited when I saw Drachenfels. My German friend told me that it was just a cottage compared to the castles in Munich but still I was super impressed. Besides the beautiful structure, the grounds are well maintained.
Hawkin Slusarski (14 months ago)
An amazing castle with a restaurant garden just below. Amazing views of the river, an extraordinary hike through the woods - if you're willing to make the trip - and an awe-inspiring interior. A funicular railway can transport you for ~€8-€12 and access is ~€10, but discounts are available.
Biser Yordanov (14 months ago)
One of my favourite castles in Germany. As we live nearby I‘m coming often here and sometimes it feels like I‘m visiting a good friend in another time. It will take way too much time and words to describe every beautiful thing and aspect of being here. So I can only say: If you are nearby and haven’t seen it- do it. Be sure also to check the ruins a little further upwards.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.