Morsbroich Museum

Leverkusen, Germany

The Museum Morsbroich is a former Baroque castle, now a municipal museum for the exhibition of modern and contemporary art. It also provides the setting for theatrical productions and other cultural events under the title 'Morsbroich Summer'.

In 1948 the castle was leased to the city of Leverkusen. Since 1951 it is used as an exhibition space. In 1974 it was sold to the city of Leverkusen and subsequently renovated in order to permanently function as the city's museum of modern art.

The Museum Morsbroich was the first museum in North Rhine-Westphalia explicitly exhibiting works by famous international post-war painters, sculptors and installation artists. It presented artists such as Yves Klein, Lucio Fontana, Louise Nevelson, Andy Warhol and Robert Motherwell. During the last 50 years it collected 400 paintings and sculptures and 5000 prints by contemporary artists.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ana Matias (17 months ago)
Top
Mike JB007 (2 years ago)
Just ok.
Suiram Travel (3 years ago)
Very nice modern museum and castle
Christos Christoglou (4 years ago)
Nice surrounding, laid back for a Sunday morning coffee. Best to drive there on bikes and enjoy the nature all around. The museum interior is the least, the ride and the outside view is what really counts.
Ricardo Mota (4 years ago)
Went for an European Culture Festival, so I didn't visit the museum. The main building is very interesting, but the gardens were a bit disappointing. I guess I was expecting more from a small palace like building.
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