Moyland Castle

Kleve, Germany

Moyland Castle (Schloss Moyland) is a moated castle in Bedburg-Hau in the district of Kleve, one of the most important neo-Gothic buildings in North Rhine-Westphalia.

1307 is the first time that a fortified farm called Moyland is documented with ditches and ramparts. It was between 1345 and 1355 redesigned by Roland von Hagedorn into a classical gothic castle with a square floor plan. In addition to three round towers it had on the north corner of a more powerful, fourth round tower, which served as a dungeon. From the interior courtyard the third tower was accessible and provided all sorts of comforts, such as a well, toilet, light niches and a fireplace. The western side of the castle was at that time, a great hall, the other sides consisted of walls with battlements. South of the main castle was a bailey, the castle gate through which the main castle was reached. In the 15th century in the courtyard of the main castle building new wings were built and a decorated chapel was added in the east tower.

Until the second half of the 17th Century there followed frequent changes of ownership inheritance, which ended in 1662, when the Brandenburg Field Marshal Alexander von Spaen purchased the fief. His descendant Wilhelm von Spaen sold the recently rebuilt castle in 1695 to the Brandenburg electors, and later Prussian King Friedrich I. He used Moyland primarily as a hunting lodge, and also as a love nest. His affair with the 17-year-old Emmericher citizen's daughter Katharina Rycker was made mention of at the Prussian court.

Under Johann Nikolaus von Steengracht from 1854 to 1862 a remodeling of the exterior was done in the Gothic Revival style. The Baroque interior was maintained largely untouched during the work under the Cologne Cathedral architect Ernst Friedrich Zwirner. The castle walls were covered with red brick and the three corner towers were fitted with battlements and pointed windows. The keep was set up with a historicist pointed roof. The gateway also experienced a reorganization and was made accessible via a newly built stone bridge. In the course of this work, the fore-castle was rebuilt on the foundation of its predecessor.

The castle survived the last battles of the Second World War relatively unscathed, until the arrival of the Allies on February 25, 1945. Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery took the castle as his headquarters. In this period Winston Churchill also came to Moyland. After they left almost all of the sumptuous interior went through theft and vandalism by Canadian soldiers, and the castle was devastated. 1987 began with repairs to restore the buildings.

The castle buildings now house the art collection of the brothers Hans van der Grinten and Franz Joseph van der Grinten, collected over 50 years. The extensive collection includes exhibits from the 19th and 20th Century, including works by Erwin Heerich, Willem den Ouden, Rudolf Schoofs and Hermann Teuber. A major focus of the comprehensive collection of works by Joseph Beuys which consists of nearly 5000 pieces and thus is the world's largest collection of his work.

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Address

Am Schloß 4, Kleve, Germany
See all sites in Kleve

Details

Founded: 1345-1355
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Al Hermes (12 months ago)
A place to enjoy peace and tranquility.the gardens are amazing,displaying many sculptures,There is also a herb garden,which was being upgraded.but when completed,a must see.you can also visit the schloss and museum.there is a cafe with outside seating.plenty of free car parking spaces.not a location to take children
Emerson (15 months ago)
Receptive and polite staff at the entrance to the museum. Affordable price. We don't visit the museum and its gardens (dogs are not allowed), but we walked outside, along the trails. Charging station for electric vehicles available in the parking lot.
Joe Campbell (2 years ago)
The grounds are absolutely fabulous. Wonderful to see the castle and walk around the beautiful gardens.
Graham Grant (2 years ago)
The castle itself was well worth a visit, beautiful! The exhibition was well set out, the staff friendly and helpful. The exhibits in the gardens were also well worth seeing. Altogether, a lovely day out.
Olga Aissatou (2 years ago)
Really worth the visit! Nature, unusual art, interesting and somewhat off color story of Joseph Beuys, modern day artist and rebel soul.
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