The Noor mansion or castle (Noors slott) is mentioned in manuscripts for the first time in 1311. In the 16th century, the crown owned the estate and then, until the 1680s, ownership was held by the Tott, Stöör and Månesköld families. The mansion was confiscated as part of the reduction by King Charles XI in 1686, whereafter it was used as a royal hunting lodge. In 1689 King Charles XI sold the mansion to his adviser Count Nils Gyldenstolpe. He rebuilt the mansion in Swedish Carolean Style, the style of fashion in Sweden during the period of the two Carolean kings, based of drawings by Jean de la Vallée. Between 1761 and 1918 Noor mansion was owned by members of the noble Hermelin family.

Nobel laureate Verner von Heidenstam wrote his historical novel The Caroleans (Karolinerna) at Noor mansion in 1897, during a spell of one year at the mansion to benefit from its late 17th Century atmosphere.

Noor mansion was renovated 1996-97 and is now a privately owned Conference Centre.

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Details

Founded: 1686
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zhixue Su (3 months ago)
This is my fourth times to be there. The food is very good. The castle also has a sauna/jacuzzi area which is quite nice.
Kim Felton (7 months ago)
Exceptional! When coming up the drive to Noor Slott, you feel like you're going back in time. After entering the castle, there is a large entranceway with a door at the end to the large garden. The castle's long distinguished history emminates from the wood beams, authentic floors and antiquities. Each guest room is unique and elegant, the service friendly and professional, and the meals are traditional and flavorful. Whichever spacious room you choose, there is a gorgeous view out every window. Known as an off-site conference and wedding location, I would ask if they have availability for tourists. It's well worth the short drive from Stockholm.
Annette Löf (8 months ago)
A really great place for a (small) conference or workshop. Truly excellent food and outstanding service. Good comfy rooms and beautiful quiet setting. Three times a guest there and every time a great experience. A place I warmly recommend!
Adam Stevenson (9 months ago)
Really nice place, good food, good staff and clean facilities.
Ülle Lennuk (11 months ago)
Here you can feel yourself like the best family friend
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