The Noor mansion or castle (Noors slott) is mentioned in manuscripts for the first time in 1311. In the 16th century, the crown owned the estate and then, until the 1680s, ownership was held by the Tott, Stöör and Månesköld families. The mansion was confiscated as part of the reduction by King Charles XI in 1686, whereafter it was used as a royal hunting lodge. In 1689 King Charles XI sold the mansion to his adviser Count Nils Gyldenstolpe. He rebuilt the mansion in Swedish Carolean Style, the style of fashion in Sweden during the period of the two Carolean kings, based of drawings by Jean de la Vallée. Between 1761 and 1918 Noor mansion was owned by members of the noble Hermelin family.

Nobel laureate Verner von Heidenstam wrote his historical novel The Caroleans (Karolinerna) at Noor mansion in 1897, during a spell of one year at the mansion to benefit from its late 17th Century atmosphere.

Noor mansion was renovated 1996-97 and is now a privately owned Conference Centre.

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Details

Founded: 1686
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

V Wx (12 months ago)
Great stay!
Ed Al (2 years ago)
While the hotel and rooms are super cozy, as well as delicious food, the staff was quite aggressive. I felt from the beginning that they were not really eager to help and always gave some snappy comments. Felt uncomfortable being there and not treated like a welcomed guest.
Antti Holopainen (2 years ago)
Beatiful Castle with very comfortable rooms. The food was excellent throughout breakfast, lounch and dinner. Nice surroundings as well and very close to airport
Sven Westergren (2 years ago)
Lovely little castle with great service and food!
Soorej Jose (4 years ago)
Nice quiet calm place with a beautiful courtyard
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