The Royal Coin Cabinet

Stockholm, Sweden

The Royal Coin Cabinet is a museum dedicated to the history of money. The museum includes exhibitions of coins, banknotes (the first in the world was issued in 1661 by Stockholms Banco), treasure hoards and piggy banks. Particularly notable are the oldest Swedish coin, a copper plate coin dating from Queen Christina's reign in 1644 that is thought at 19.7 kg to be the heaviest in the world, some of the Lohe treasure found in 1937 on Gamla Stan, Weimar Republic inflation currency and some Nobel prize medals.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joe Gardiner (10 months ago)
Hidden little gem, well worth a quick visit. Also, it’s free!
Giorgio Berardi (2 years ago)
A very good collection of specimens from all over the world, covering a great part of the world history of money (both coins and paper). On the upper floor, you also find educational sections aimed primarily to young people and children.
Timothy Karlsson (2 years ago)
Very well built, a lot of coins to look at not very much info in english but still fun to visit and the best of all is that it is free.
Certainly NOT the best pianist, but still (2 years ago)
Nice museum for someone who is interrested in different coins and banknotes. The museum isn't big, but nice and - what's quite important - free. Nothing special but worth seeing if you are nearby
Lenny Soshinskiy (2 years ago)
75% of info is not translated into English. The exhibition should represent non-European currencies better. The museum has a good potential, but not there yet. What can one expect from governmental funding :(
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