Hohensyburg Castle

Dortmund, Germany

The Hohensyburg, a castle complex of the Lords of Sieberg, was constructed on the grounds of a former Saxon refuge, which was conquered in 775 by the Franks under Charlemagne. The castle, which was built around 1100 of Ruhr sandstone, was partially destroyed in 1287 by Count Eberhard I. von der Mark. The castle complex was an imperial fief of the von der Mark counts from 1300. This fiefdom was transferred to Brandenburg in 1609, and later to Prussia.

Two keeps, residential quarters (two-chamber system), the wall ring and the walls around the courtyard complex are still recognisable. In the inside of the castle is a war memorial by Fritz Bagdons.

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Dortmund, Germany
See all sites in Dortmund

Details

Founded: c. 1100
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.dortmund-tourismus.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Artur Alves (3 years ago)
Very beautiful and peaceful.
Richard Shift (3 years ago)
A good place for a walk, specially if there's snow.. Alot of people was playing there, also with the children.
Ambrose Mosha (3 years ago)
Was real good and its nice place for chilling and having fun
Mainak Das Gupta (4 years ago)
Very nice place to spend some time strolling through the woods and ruins. The view of the Rhur river from the top is quite nice. My only complain is that there are no informative plaques around the memorial. One needs to read about the details over the internet.
Carlos Gomez (4 years ago)
Excellent place to visit, great view, walking trails, benches to seat and rest. Great place to take photographs. Autumn must be beautiful there. After your visit make sure you go to a town near by to enjoy coffee and great hospitality.
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