Bensberg Palace

Bensberg, Germany

Bensberg Palace (Schloss Bensberg) is a former hunting lodge of the Counts Palatine of the Rhine (the House of Wittelsbach). The palace was commissioned by Johann Wilhelm, Elector Palatine for his wife Anna Maria Luisa de' Medici. Anna Maria Luisa enjoyed the site's elevated scenery and views onto the River Rhine, Rhine Valley and Cologne Bight. The building was designed by Italian Baroque architect Matteo Alberti and completed in 1711.

Today Bensberg Palace is a hotel.

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Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jana Detering (10 months ago)
Really nice 5 star hotel! Awesome service and a very welcome feeling! amazing food and a nice spa area.I would give 5 stars but I wasn't able to turn off the heating (central system not manually in the room) which was quite loud. So I'll be back in summer !
juan martinez (12 months ago)
We were there for a 4 day meeting. Great ambience. The meeting rooms are great. The service is exceptional.
David Proctor (12 months ago)
A great five star hotel with peerless service and cleanliness. The food for breakfast was great and for a company event we also ate lunch and dinner at the hotel - exceptional. Really feels like royalty staying in this castle!
Abbas Khasho (12 months ago)
It is one of the best plasce where I had the best meal ever. Supper tasty, supper quality supper enjoyable environment. I love it.
Arild Braute Årdal (14 months ago)
Superb rooms, extremely quiet and fantastic beds. Lovely pool area and very good gourmet food. A nearby forest is ideal for trekking and if you brought your electric Porsche with you, it can be charged in their spacious garage under the hotel.
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Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

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Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.