Bensberg Palace

Bensberg, Germany

Bensberg Palace (Schloss Bensberg) is a former hunting lodge of the Counts Palatine of the Rhine (the House of Wittelsbach). The palace was commissioned by Johann Wilhelm, Elector Palatine for his wife Anna Maria Luisa de' Medici. Anna Maria Luisa enjoyed the site's elevated scenery and views onto the River Rhine, Rhine Valley and Cologne Bight. The building was designed by Italian Baroque architect Matteo Alberti and completed in 1711.

Today Bensberg Palace is a hotel.

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Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael H (2 years ago)
MARVELOUS stay in the small city of Bergisch Glasbach. They had the most excellent staff who were always on hand to care for our every need. We stayed in the best suite in the old castle, and also dined one night in the very posh "Restaurant Vendôme." The meal was superb, but the waiter tipped over a candle and spilled paraffin wax on the brand new laceless shoes I'd bought to expedite passing through security at airports. Very handsome and friendly young German men were on hand to answer questions and help in any way a guest might ask, and also spoke excellent English, my first language. This place is NOT for the budget conscious. Our suite was on the top level, and we had an amazing view of the countryside for miles/kilometers around. Built for Johann Wilhelm II, Elector Palatine, of the 17th and 18th centuries, the palace has been updated in every imaginable way to make it luxurious for the 21st century visitor!
Majory Stevense (2 years ago)
Wauw top hotel! It was a surprise of my husband and I loved it. Just amazing.
Holger v.d. Linde (2 years ago)
Very nice place but clearly, 28 Euros (!) for overnight parking is insane, 5.20 Euros for a small cappuccino and 6 Euros for a double espresso are also a bit steep! The room (Junior Suite, 335 Euros !) is too gloomy, the view not that great but the bathroom is very beautiful!
Kim Hansen (3 years ago)
This place is very nice, beautiful building, great service and nice food. Room (junior suite) was in perfect condition and had everything I needed, good size, nice view. Was greeted everywhere (valet parking, outside cafe, reception and restaurant) with a smile and nice service. I speak German but get a feeling, that the English level there, is quite high. No complaints about this place, the only downsides, is that it's a little bit away from Köln and green area in the back isn't that great. Well worth the money.
Scott Bends (3 years ago)
The 1700’s chateau itself is a treat to visit. The space is well used for guest rooms and group spaces. The rooms benefit from the 18ft Tall ceilings (approx) - so regardless of the size type of room, it feels grand. Set on a hill, the hotel property and rooms have a view of the surrounding area. The small Main Street of the town is a short walk from the front gate, making a couple local restaurants an easy stroll. The room key is a metal replica of the main building’s domed turret, with an actual key attached, its the kind of key you might choose to leave at the front desk when you leave the hotel. It reminds you of how a hotel used to be when the staff remembers you as you walk up to retrieve it. The outdoor space from the bar is comfortable for a cocktail or dinner. The climate of the hotel is calm with a relaxed elegance. The entire staff is helpful and friendly. I visited for a business trip but would make a stop for a vacation. Bar none, the best hotel I’ve stayed at in 10 years.
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