Burg Castle (Schloss Burg) is the largest reconstructed castle in North Rhine-Westphalia and a popular tourist attraction. Its early history is closely connected to the rise of the Duchy of Berg.

In the beginning of the 12th century (after 1133), Count Adolf III of Berg built Schloss Burg on a mountain overlooking the river Wupper. Not until the 15th century, after significant reconstruction as a hunting castle, did it receive its current name reflecting its palatial extension.

His great-grandson, Count Adolf VI of Berg took part in the Fifth Crusade and died during the siege of Damietta in Egypt in 1218. Since the late count had not any male descendants his younger brother, archbishop Engelbert I of Cologne, took over the reign of the county needing two feuds to win the inheritance dispute with Duke Waleran III of Limburg. As count Engelbert II of Berg he built the palas of Burg castle 1218-1225. Engelbert was a very powerful man, not only archbishop and count, but also advisor and chief administrator to the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, and guardian and tutor of the later king Henry (VII) of Germany. But he also made enemies and on November 7, 1225 he was murdered by his nephew Friedrich von Isenberg.

The War of succession for the Duchy of Limburg influenced the history of the castle. Count Adolf VIII of Berg participated successfully in the decisive battle of Worringen on 5 June 1288. After the battle, the opposing archbishop of Cologne, Siegfried II of Westerburg, was kept prisoner in the castle. Adolf VIII now was able to proceed to elevate his town, Düsseldorf, to a city and was able to control traffic on the Rhine river. In the 13th and 14th century Schloss Burg remained the main residence of the counts of Berg. Five years after King Wenzel elevated Count William to the position of a duke in 1380, Düsseldorf became the capital of the Duchy of Berg. Schloss Burg continued to serve as a hunting castle and was used for ceremonial events, hence it became a 'Schloss' (representative castle). Thus in 1496, Maria of Jülich-Berg was engaged as a child to John of Cleves-Mark (later John III, Duke of Cleves). Their wedding took place 14 years later at Burg and led to the unification of the duchies of Jülich-Cleves-Berg. The second daughter of this couple was Anne of Cleves, briefly married with Henry VIII of England.

In 1632 Swedish soldiers laid siege to the castle. After the Thirty years war, in 1648, Imperial troops destroyed the fortifications of the castle including the keep, walls, and gates. In 1700, the main building was partially reconstructed and subsequently used for administrative purposes. 1849, the castle was sold to be scrapped, decayed, and became a ruin.

The architect Gerhard August Fischer from Barmen proposed in 1882 the reconstruction and submitted drawings and plans based on old documents, primarily using the castle’s appearance in the 16th century. Since 1890 the castle reconstruction committee led the restoration of the castle during the next 24 years. With the erection of the Battery Tower in 1914 the work seemed completed.

On the night of November 26, 1920 a large fire destroyed much of the castle. Subsequently visitors had to pay entry fees and the money was used to restore and rebuild the castle again. Reconstruction lasted from 1922 to 1925. In 1929 the Engelbert monument by the sculptor Paul Wynand was dedicated to honor the builder and archbishop.

Today’s appearance does not exactly match the condition documented by Erich Philipp Ploennies at about 1715. The reconstructed castle of today is a major public attraction. It also contains the Museum of the Bergische Land. The castle church is popular for weddings. The castle also is home to the Memorial for Deportation and the Memorial of the German Eastern Provinces with church bells from Königsberg and Breslau. In addition, commercial shops for souvenirs are located on the grounds.

The surroundings offer hiking trails to the forests and to Unterburg, that is where the village is located, at the foot of the mountain. There you can buy the Burger Brezel, a local pretzel specialty; the pretzel bakers even have a monument. A chairlift connects Unterburg and the castle.

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Details

Founded: c. 1133
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yashwini Ramappa (2 months ago)
Beautiful castle with nice scenery and walk area. It was raining when we visited the place. The Autumn view was really amazing. Please do have a look at the pics and for more do follow me on insta @yashwini_ramappa Pros: 1) Beautiful scenery and walk area 2) Food outlets and restaurants are available 3) Parking area which is 20 meter away 4) Toilets are very neat and clean
Beata Jonik-Nowak (3 months ago)
Very nice, kids friendly castle. Be aware that it is all about taking many steps up and down to make the round visit inside. Huge part of the castle is still under renovation (until 2025). Last but not least - a very nice and helpful lady that is taking care of toilets and not only - whatever your question or worry is, she will do her best to help or find the best solution for you.
Andrii Lutskevych (5 months ago)
Very nice castle! You can walk outside - it's an area with small streets. Restaurants and cafes are on the castle's territory. Also you can find funicular (it's not for free). You can buy tickets to visit inside of the castle. With baby carriage you can not do it. But you can leave it outside - no problem. On the territory you can find a playground for kids.
Sreeram Sadasivam (5 months ago)
The Sesselbahn over Wupper river is worth the money. The castle is undergoing renovation until 2023. Therefore, I would advise you to travel there post renovations. The view from the top is really memorable.
The Marvellous Mom (5 months ago)
The castle was beautiful but was under some construction work so we were unable to cover the whole castle. We went to the top which was exciting and beautiful scenery was eye catching. Definitely recommended. The best part is the souvenir shops had some of the best souvenirs you would love to take home with you?
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