Roman Archeological Park

Xanten, Germany

In the first century BC. the Romans set their sights on the Lower Rhineland. They erected a military camp on the Fürstenberg so that they could advance into Germania to the east of the Rhine by crossing the river Lippe.

After the devastating defeat of Varus by the Germanic forces led by Arminius in 9 AD, the river Rhine became the eastern frontier of the Roman empire. A port and a settlement developed north of the camp. About 98 AD Emperor Traian granted the settlement colony status, and this became Colonia Ulpia Traiana.

Streets in a grid pattern, sewers, town walls, a forum, temples, baths and an amphitheatre were built, and all from stone that had to be hauled more than 100 kilometres down the Rhine.

In the Xanten Archaeological Park, some buildings have been partly reconstructed, some rebuilt and furnished to give visitors an idea of what the settlement would have been like. Original remains of Roman buildings can also be seen.

Roman museum

The modern steel and glass building is situated on the historic site of the major Roman settlement Colonia Ulpia Traiana. It is built on the excavated foundations of the entrance hall of the public baths. The size and the shape of the modern building correspond to the ancient Roman original.

Among the exhibits on display are the remains of a Roman boat, suspended from the ceiling at a height of 12 metres. Further highlights are a stunning, large mural and the oldest and best preserved Roman cannon yet discovered. Spanish oil amphorae, silver tableware, pottery and a considerable collection of Roman army weapons and equipment are also  on display.

Roman Baths 

The municipal public baths of Colonia Ulpia Traiana were built under Emporor Hadrian around A.D. 125. The complex comprised hot, warm and cold baths, changing rooms, saunas and a sports-field.

The baths, destroyed in 275, were rediscovered in 1879. The museum building was openend in 1999. The building, combining glass and steel, reflects the design and dimensions of the original, allowing visitors to get a good impression of the imposing size of these ancient baths.

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Details

Founded: 98 AD
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

www.xanten.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alessandro Conterno (10 months ago)
Really interesting , i was there 15 years ago , now is even better , just close too early 18.00 o'clock im April start to be too early
Erwin Demkes (13 months ago)
Great experience and impressive buildings
EFS!nforMARE photography (2 years ago)
Really unique place to observe ancient Roman (re)builds and artefacts! And during the next coming years, there's more to discover...
Karl Themel (2 years ago)
This is a park with reconstructed Roman buildings located on a Roman town site. The Park is also a research institution and museum. The arena is used for classical concerts.
David Utrecht (2 years ago)
Big park. Lots to see. It's better if it's good weather.
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