Brüggen Castle

Brüggen, Germany

Brüggen Castle was the most important castle in the north of the Duchy of Jülich. The castle was built by the Count of Kessel in the 13th century to guard a ford over the River Schwalm. In the early 14th century it went into the possession of the dukes of Jülich, who had the existing building replaced by a quadrangular castle made from brick. After the occupation of Brüggen in 1794 by Napoleonic troops it was confiscated and resold by the French government to a private individual at the beginning of the 19th century. Today part of the castle houses a hunting and natural history museum.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Guan Cody (17 months ago)
good
Roy Sargeant (2 years ago)
This is a great place to visit if you are near the town. The natural history museum inside is quite good and is focused on the local area. The town itself is wonderful with a wide choice of restaurants and smaller eateries with a good selection a very short walk from the castle. A point worth mentioning is that you can hire cycles from within the castle grounds to explore the local area on great cycle routes.
Brian Ko (2 years ago)
First time to visit ancient German castle, thanks to EA ElektroAutomatik!
Tomasz Chmiel (2 years ago)
Nice for short walk.
Chuck Palm (2 years ago)
Interesting older architecture, but the Museum tour is not much related to the building. It's mostly about hunting in the region.
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