Hugenpoet Castle

Essen, Germany

Hugenpoet estate was first time mentioned in 778 AD as a royal property of Charlemagne. The medieval feudal castle was burned down in 1478 during the feud. The new castle was built near in 1647 after it was again badly damaged in the Thirty Years' War.  Today it has been restored as a hotel.

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Details

Founded: 1647
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

www.hugenpoet.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arjan Tupan (2 years ago)
Lovely castle in a beautiful setting. Great Christmas Market and other events. But also a really good restaurant. You can't go wrong here. If you're looking for a nice place to eat, this is a great choice.
Yacouba Coulibaly (2 years ago)
Very nice Castle Hotel. The rooms are beautiful with their historical decorations but in winter it can be a bit chilly. The service is top with a very nice, almost personalised, breakfast.
Seid Kapetanovic (3 years ago)
Very pleasant place.
Philipp Johnssen (3 years ago)
excellent food, great service and a very comfortable place to stay. Highly recommended.
Adéla Šagátová (3 years ago)
Very special beautiful venue. Nice new and clean rooms. The food in the hotel restaurant is very tasty. Great for business events and workshops.
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