Ordensburg Vogelsang

Schleiden, Germany

Ordensburg Vogelsang is a former National Socialist estate placed at the former military training area in Eifel National Park. The landmarked and completely preserved estate was used by the National Socialists between 1936 and 1939 as an educational centre for future leaders. Since 1 January 2006 the area has been open to visitors. It is one of the largest architectural relics of National Socialism. The gross area of the landmarked buildings is 50,000 m2.

The three buildings at Eifel have been known as 'NS-Ordensburg' since 1935. The first phase of the project was the construction of the Castle of Vogelsang, which with up to 1,500 workers took only two years. Several much bigger buildings were also planned, such as a huge library to be called the 'House of Knowledge' measuring 100 metres by 300 metres, a 'Kraft durch Freude' hotel with 2000 beds, and the biggest sports facilities in Europe. Construction at the site halted on the outbreak of war.

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Details

Founded: 1935
Category:
Historical period: Nazi Germany (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luthien Azaelia (18 months ago)
Beautiful way to display a horrible chapter in history, great for learning what happened there. It is so incredible to be in a place that was surrounded by hate, but in such a beautiful and peaceful surrounding. Really challenges the mind in a good way
Neiler Medina (18 months ago)
Nice views from here. Excellent point to start hiking around the Dam. You can find Parking, restaurant, toilets and lockers here.
Kefren Mertens (20 months ago)
As a WW2 history buff, the area is filled with interesting sites. While not the most jaw dropping or spine chilling experience I've had on my war-related travels it's fascinating to see what the place once was. The megalomaniac ideas are very obvious when staring in the wide forested area.
Michael Eldred (20 months ago)
A valuable and necessary insight to the rise of national socialism. Should be a required visit for all to learn the dangers of indoctrination. A well laid out museum with an additional museum for the animal and bird life of the Eiffel region and demonstrating the dangers of climate change and its causes. Good parking or access by bus from Aachen
Martin Bird (21 months ago)
Great new exhibition and museum split into 2 separate themed areas. Well worth a visit.
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