Basilica of the Holy Apostles

Cologne, Germany

The Basilica of the Holy Apostles (Basilika St. Aposteln) is one of the twelve Romanesque churches built in Cologne in that period. Its glory is the domed clover leaf chancel, which was built around 1200. The story of how today’s building originated begins in the 11th century.

At that time the church was on the road in the direction of Aachen, directly ahead of the roman city walls at the western main gate.

In the 13th century the church was significantly enlarged. In addition to the clover leaf chancel there was also the octagonal dome above the crossing, which was added at this time, which gives St. Aposteln its monumental, almost Byzantine appearance. The old structures were retained and, in spite of the building modifications, were copied and integrated into the new construction project.

The sequential and complementary building phases can be well identified in the St. Aposteln church. An extraordinary and controversial combination of historical and modern art is shown with a glance into the choral arches: the modern paintings by Herrmann Gottfried from the years 1988 until 1994 always provoke a host of diverse opinions.

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Address

Neumarkt 30, Cologne, Germany
See all sites in Cologne

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.cologne-tourism.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Віталь Саўчык (3 years ago)
Прыгожа. Праўда, навпкол усё забудавана - няма перспектывы
Goran A. (3 years ago)
Amazing architecture among other kind of residential buildings!
Whistle Racer (3 years ago)
Magnificent architecture
Isabella Georges (5 years ago)
Very beautiful romanesque church. The interieur is amazingly. What's more, it's unbelievable quiet inside, considering it's in the city centre. Great place to calm down and find some peace.
SAM JACKSON (5 years ago)
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