Mariawald Abbey

Heimbach, Germany

Mariawald Abbey is a monastery of the Trappists (formally known as the Cistercians of the Strict Observance), located above the village of Heimbach. Following Heinrich Fluitter's vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary, a shrine and chapel were built on the site of it, which became a place of pilgrimage, the Marienwallfahrt. For the proper care of the site and the pilgrims land was given in 1480 to the Cistercians of Bottenbroich Abbey, who established a priory here, which they were able to move into on 4 April 1486. The new monastery took its name from the shrine to Mary and from the woods in which it was situated: 'Marienwald', or 'Mary's wood'.

In 1795 the monastery was closed as a result of the French Revolution and the monks were expelled. The image of the Virgin was removed to safety in Heimbach. The priory buildings were abandoned and allowed to fall into decay. In 1860 the priory was re-settled by Trappist monks from Oelenberg Abbey in Alsace.

The monks had to leave the monastery yet again under the Nazi regime during World War II, from 1941 until April 1945, when the surviving members of the community were able to return. The monastery had to be largely rebuilt, because it had been seriously damaged in the war. After World War II, a brewery was run at the abbey until 1956 when beer production ceased, in part due to availability of water and brewing ingredients.

The monks follow the Rule of St. Benedict and the constitution of the Cistercians of the Strict Observance. Visitors can also stay a few days in the abbey's guesthouse, but the parts of the monastery used by the monastic community cannot be visited. The abbey runs a tavern and bookshop. It also produces and sells its own liqueur.

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Details

Founded: 1486
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristof Vanheukelom (2 years ago)
Was ok.
Jose Lejin P J (3 years ago)
Mariawald Abbey is the church near to Eifel National Park. Beautiful place to visit. Very nice to walk around the church. Great landscape. You can really enjoy the nature. Best time to visit is spring or summer.
Rosa Maria Quintana Lehminger (3 years ago)
Very nice place. Abbey with restaurant (pea soup is the speciality of the house): You can eat there and also take coffee and cake.
Holland Decoded (3 years ago)
Very nice place to visit. It's possible also to eat there and on weekends they host a mass for tourists.
Frank Wils (3 years ago)
A beautiful winding road leads trough the Nord Eifel up to this old abbey. The abbey itself can't be visited, but the abbey restaurant is famous for its 'erbsensuppe', peasoup. Also the fresh salad with forel is very good. The abbey itself is not open for visitors, but there is also an interesting shop inside. And please take a moment to enjoy the scenery!
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