Shortly after the Romans founded Cologne in 50 AD, they built a wall around the city. The wall was first expanded in the tenth century, and again in 1106, but due to the continuing growth of the city a new, 7 meters high wall was built in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

The most important of the twelve gates that gave entrance to Cologne was the west gate, known as the Hahnentor. After their coronation in Aachen, German kings arrived in Cologne through this gate to revere the shrine of the Three Magi in the Cologne cathedral. The gate was built between 1235 and 1240 and was probably named after a citizen named Hageno, who owned the nearby land.

The Hahnentorburg has two semi-circular, crenellated towers. The city's coat of arms is depicted above the entrance. The tower was restored in 1890 by the city architect Josef Stubben; a memorial plaque commemorates the architect's construction of Neustadt (new city) between 1881 and 1898 outside the former city walls. The tower was severely damaged during the Second World War, but was later reconstructed.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1235-1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.aviewoncities.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manuel De Gomar (12 months ago)
Best Weihnachtsmarkt in town! Great atmosphere, totally recommended ?
sonya schwarz (17 months ago)
Whenever I'm in Cologne, I stay at a hotel feet away from this landmark.
Jan Vagner (17 months ago)
Very nice and old building. Interesting to see.
Masoud Aqil (18 months ago)
A beautiful historical landmark in the middle of the city center.
Rich Vdn (2 years ago)
The gate itself is ancient and is surrounded by cobbled street. Close to the metro, restaurants, bars and cafes. Well connected to the shopping areas.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.