Shortly after the Romans founded Cologne in 50 AD, they built a wall around the city. The wall was first expanded in the tenth century, and again in 1106, but due to the continuing growth of the city a new, 7 meters high wall was built in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

The most important of the twelve gates that gave entrance to Cologne was the west gate, known as the Hahnentor. After their coronation in Aachen, German kings arrived in Cologne through this gate to revere the shrine of the Three Magi in the Cologne cathedral. The gate was built between 1235 and 1240 and was probably named after a citizen named Hageno, who owned the nearby land.

The Hahnentorburg has two semi-circular, crenellated towers. The city's coat of arms is depicted above the entrance. The tower was restored in 1890 by the city architect Josef Stubben; a memorial plaque commemorates the architect's construction of Neustadt (new city) between 1881 and 1898 outside the former city walls. The tower was severely damaged during the Second World War, but was later reconstructed.

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Details

Founded: 1235-1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.aviewoncities.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Goran A. (21 months ago)
Amazingly beautiful structure!
Ivan Dean Ochan (22 months ago)
Lovely place, such a breath taking sight
Kristie Foran (22 months ago)
It would be nice if there was more information on maps. At one time the medieval city was surrounded but a great wall, and I believe this is one of the 12 original gates.
T Haan (2 years ago)
Great Christmas Market,go for it!
veronica corvasce (2 years ago)
very nice piazza.. on thursday there is a very good food market
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