Steinfeld Abbey

Kall, Germany

Steinfeld Abbey is a former Premonstratensian monastery, now a Salvatorian convent. The origins of the site go back to about 920. The first monastic settlement at Steinfeld took place in about 1070, and the Premonstratensians settled here in 1130. It became an important monastery in the German Empire, and established a number of daughter houses across Europe, including Strahov Abbey in Prague. It was raised to the status of an abbey in 1184.

In 1802, Steinfeld Abbey was secularised. The basilica was put to use as a parish church, while the conventual buildings were used for a number of secular purposes until 1923, when the Salvatorians acquired them.

The basilica, formerly the abbey church, was built between 1142 and 1150 by the Premonstratensians as one of the earliest vaulted churches in Germany. The present structure includes features from a number of periods and styles, from the original Romanesque style through Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque up to modern stainless steel elements.

The church received the status of a papal basilica minor in 1960. It comprises altogether eight bays and six chapels, including Saint Stephen's Chapel and Saint Ursula's Chapel.

The basilica contains the tomb of Hermann Joseph of Steinfeld, a popular Premonstratensian saint, situated in the middle of the church and covered with a slab and a recumbent figure of alabaster, carved in 1732. This has become a pilgrimage destination. By custom apples are left here, in reference to a legend that Hermann once offered an apple to the Christ Child in the arms of the Madonna in the church of St. Maria im Kapitol at Cologne - who took it.

The basilica also contains the well-known König-Orgel ('King Organ'), one of the most significant church organs of the Rhineland Baroque period. It was built around 1600, with additions in 1680, 1727 and 1934. It was taken out of service in 1977. In 1981, the organ was thoroughly restored by the firm Josef Weimbs Orgelbau from Hellenthal. It is composed of 1,956 pipes and 35 registers; the original pipework is still largely intact.

The original Romanesque cloister was replaced between 1492 and 1517 by a Gothic one. After the dissolution in 1802 the stained glass windows, made between 1526 and 1557 by Gerhard Remisch, were sold by a local dealer to a compatriot in Norwich in England. Some panels found their way to village churches in East Anglia, but the majority reached Lord Brownlow's collection at Ashridge Park, from where they were purchased by the Victoria and Albert Museum. Two panels are now in Steinfeld again.

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Details

Founded: 1070
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Lee (2 years ago)
It's wonderfully peaceful here, the rooms are luxurious, the food is the best I'd had in more than a week and incredibly well priced! I just wish I could have stayed for longer. The area isn't especially exciting but of you're hiking through it's a great chance to give yourself an evening of serene luxury to stay here.
T. D'dorf (3 years ago)
Incredible
Janez Zavašnik (4 years ago)
It was a really nice venue for our small conference. Quiet and friendy, but then again: we were there to "work". And yes, no problems while arranging everything.
Ram Gopal (4 years ago)
Excellent guest house to stay in the middle of nature. Very peaceful place and I loved it. Place is very well maintained. Basilika is next to the new guest house and they are oreserving it very well. Restaurant is also decent in the old building, food vareity could be better for vegetarians but its manageable. Employees are very friendly. Swimming pool is available on site but timings are restricted. Wifi is available for free throughout the guest house but in some corners signal is very weak.
Gabriel Pohsiang Shih (5 years ago)
Experience of a special Christmas
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