Soestdijk Palace

Baarn, Netherlands

Soestdijk is a former palace of the Dutch Royal Family. It consists of a central block and two wings. It was the home for over six decades of Queen Juliana and her husband, Prince Bernhard until their deaths in 2004.

In the middle of the seventeenth century the Country house on the Zoestdijk was built for Cornelis de Graeff. After the rampjaar his son Jacob de Graeff sold it to Stadhouder William III. Then the palace originally started as a hunting lodge that was built between 1674 and 1678 by Maurits Post, who was also involved in building two other royal palaces, Huis ten Bosch Palace and Noordeinde Palace. William left the Netherlands in 1688 to reside in London as William III of England.

During the French invasion in 1795, the palace was seized as a spoil of war and turned into an inn for French troops. When Louis Bonaparte became King of Holland, he took possession of it and had it extended and refurnished.

It was presented to William II of the Netherlands in 1815 in recognition of his services at the Battle of Waterloo. From 1816 to 1821, the palace was significantly expanded by adding two wings, the northern or Baarn wing, and the southern or Soest wing. In 1842 its contents were enriched by the addition of the neoclassical furnishings of his former palace in Brussels, today the Palais des Académies.

Soestdijk became the property of the State of the Netherlands in 1971, though it was used by Princess Juliana (Queen of the Netherlands from 1948–1980) and Prince Bernhard as their official residence until both of their deaths in 2004. Soestdijk Palace then remained empty and unused for over a year before its opening to the public. Since spring 2006, it has been possible to visit.

A forest, the Baarnse Bos, is adjacent to the palace. It was developed as a French landscape garden between 1733 and 1758.

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Founded: 1674
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Netherlands

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeroen De V (12 months ago)
Love my home town
kuipers andre (13 months ago)
Great
Dano Kĩrĩro (19 months ago)
Its a very very beautiful place, but then again its a palace the very symbol of elitist life style and detached rulers. Its nice to go and see what privilege can buy and how people still rule just because they are born. Go see, go learn and yes enjoy the gardens. I would suggest it be turned into a hotel but then again am not dutch.
Miriam 123 (2 years ago)
It was where Juliana lived she was a sister to queen Beatrice. Unfortunately we couldn't see inside the palace as they were full next viewing was too late for us. We will go next time we are over. The grounds were magnificent worth a visit.
Eline Reviews (2 years ago)
Nice palace with garden. The tour is recommended. It was great to see the worn out furnature and hear about the inside stories. You van visit prins Bernard’s toilet as it is still operational.
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