Château de Roquebrune-Cap-Martin

Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France

Conrad I, Count of Vintimiglia, built the castle in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin in 970 to defend the Western border of his feudal domain from attack by hordes of Saracens that rampaged around the area. Initially the entire village was encompassed by the castle. The keep's military strength was reinforced in the 15th century by the Grimaldi family. In 1808  the castle was sold as a Bien National to five Roquebrune inhabitants. A century later, in 1911, it was sold again – this time to wealthy Englishman Sir William Ingram, who set about renovating it but eventually gave it to the town of Roquebrune in 1921. The castle overlooks the medieval village and its atmospheric alleyways, sometimes carved out of the rock itself.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 970 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

More Information

www.rcm-tourisme.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jane Fay (3 years ago)
Fantastic ....the village,the views,the people. Amazing area
Alexandra Mel (3 years ago)
The old village of Roquebrune is like a cart postal, with the narrow streets next to the medieval castle and the amazing views of côté de azur.
Alessio Claudio Cavezzan (3 years ago)
Magnificent panorama over Monaco Monte Carlo and surrounding coast . Do not miss it in a clear sky day.
Chris Ryan (4 years ago)
Nice views and interesting though some of the changes made (decades ago) are unusual.
Videoturysta EU (4 years ago)
Amazing castle from the 10th century. You have to climb a little since it's located on the hilltop. However you will have awesome views of the Mediterranean coast from the castle.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.