Château de Roquebrune-Cap-Martin

Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France

Conrad I, Count of Vintimiglia, built the castle in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin in 970 to defend the Western border of his feudal domain from attack by hordes of Saracens that rampaged around the area. Initially the entire village was encompassed by the castle. The keep's military strength was reinforced in the 15th century by the Grimaldi family. In 1808  the castle was sold as a Bien National to five Roquebrune inhabitants. A century later, in 1911, it was sold again – this time to wealthy Englishman Sir William Ingram, who set about renovating it but eventually gave it to the town of Roquebrune in 1921. The castle overlooks the medieval village and its atmospheric alleyways, sometimes carved out of the rock itself.

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Details

Founded: 970 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

More Information

www.rcm-tourisme.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jane Fay (3 years ago)
Fantastic ....the village,the views,the people. Amazing area
Alexandra Mel (3 years ago)
The old village of Roquebrune is like a cart postal, with the narrow streets next to the medieval castle and the amazing views of côté de azur.
Alessio Claudio Cavezzan (3 years ago)
Magnificent panorama over Monaco Monte Carlo and surrounding coast . Do not miss it in a clear sky day.
Chris Ryan (4 years ago)
Nice views and interesting though some of the changes made (decades ago) are unusual.
Videoturysta EU (4 years ago)
Amazing castle from the 10th century. You have to climb a little since it's located on the hilltop. However you will have awesome views of the Mediterranean coast from the castle.
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