Hauteroche Castle Ruins

Viroinval, Belgium

Hauteroche ('High Rock') is a ruined 14th-century castle, destroyed after a siege in 1554, in the village of Dourbes in the municipality of Viroinval, province of Namur. It is situated on a ca. 50 meters high, rocky promontory, looking out over the valley of the Viroin river. The isolated site of the castle is separated from the plateau by a large, hand cut ditch. It has a square keep with 2.5 meter thick walls and it would originally have been at least 13 meters high.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manolo (17 months ago)
Pas très très accessible mais vue splendide !
Siegfried Denolf (2 years ago)
Steep climb (especially when it's wet)
Krista Petersone (3 years ago)
Spectacular!
Henry (3 years ago)
Rewarded with a view after a feasible walk. Worth visiting if you're in the neighborhood.
Lark Sisterman (3 years ago)
Ruins of a castle with a view on the valley.
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