Uppsala Castle

Uppsala, Sweden

Uppsala Castle is a 16th century royal castle in the historical city of Uppsala. Throughout much of its early history, the castle played a major role in the history of Sweden. It was built during the time Sweden was on its way to become a great power in Europe.

King Gustav Vasa began construction of Uppsala Castle in 1549. Kings Erik XIV, John III and Charles IX all remodeled and expanded the citadel into a representative renaissance palace. During Erik XIV's reign, the castle was the site of the Sture Murders, where several famous noblemen (among them three members of the influential Sture family) were killed. In 1630, King Gustavus II Adolphus announced the decision that Sweden should participate in the Thirty Years' War. It was in the castle that the Swedish government announced the abdication of Queen Kristina in 1654.

Uppsala Castle was seriously damaged by fire in 1702, being reduced essentially to a ruin. Reconstruction took many years and was indeed hampered by the remains of the castle being used as a quarry for stone to be used in building Stockholm Palace.

Uppsala Castle was the administrative center of Uppland and the site of the Hall of State (Rikssalen) for many years. Uppsala Castle is the residence of the County Governor of Uppsala County. Dag Hammarskjöld, former Secretary-General of the United Nations, spent his childhood days in the castle when his father, Hjalmar Hammarskjöld, was governor of Uppsala County. Today, the castle is also the site of the Uppsala Art Museum.

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Details

Founded: 1549
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Assi (2 years ago)
It's a nice place to visit..the view from the top can see all Uppsala city.
Olga P (2 years ago)
I don't know if it's worth going inside but for a look around and a nice view it's perfect
Carlo Alberto Scola (2 years ago)
Very nice palace with a beautiful garden. I would say "strange" modern museum inside you can visit for free!
Abbas Erfani (2 years ago)
Nice place to look over the city, but on its own a bit featureless and sterile particularly if you expect something of southern Europe variety. Having said that, the views over the amazing city of Uppsala compensates beautifully and then some. Best thing about the place is to appreciate the BEST of northern cities.
Minnie Strindin (2 years ago)
It's a castle with a hideous colour, but a lot of nice history and architecture. The view is the best in town, and if you're willing to pay there are guided tours up on the roof, so that view should be spectacular. There's also the art's museum, where I've seen baby interesting exhibitions
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