Colombier Castle was built in the 11th or 12th century as a fortified tower over the ruins of the Roman villa. It expanded in the 13th Century and by the 16th century had reached its present appearance. 

One of the largest Roman era villas in Switzerland was excavated from under the castle in 1840-42 by Frédéric Dubois de Montperreux. It was built in multiple stages between the 1st and 3rd centuries AD into a palatial mansion with a peristyle, at least two baths with mosaics and frescoes and terraced gardens. 

In 1806, Colombier Castle was converted into a military hospital. Starting in 1824 it was used by the Federal militias as a parade ground and was converted into a barracks and given an expanded arsenal. In 1877 it became the official barracks of the 2. Division, which later became Field Division 2. In 2003, the Army XXI reforms dissolved the Division and in 2004 the barracks became an infantry training center.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Rug (9 months ago)
Nice place to visit in Colombier with a beautiful garden.
Daniela Gaugler (12 months ago)
Very nice castle complex, worth seeing.
Manuela Mura (2 years ago)
Unfortunately no longer a museum. But really nice.
SCC FDFA (2 years ago)
A place particularly rich in its distant past, because it was built on Roman ruins. A visit is necessary even though the military museum is unfortunately no longer in operation for the moment. This being the Château de Colombier will impress you with its majestic stature. And for gourmets, the Caveau restaurant awaits you with its gourmet menus.
Michael Rutz (2 years ago)
Impossante Schloss- und Burganlage, heute immer noch durch die Schweizer Armee genutzt, sehenswert! Das Museum im Schloss war leider geschlossen bei unserem Besuch.
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