Finlaystone House is a mansion and estate in the Inverclyde council area. Finlaystone was a property of the Dennistoun family, and passed to the Cunninghams in the 15th century. It was the seat of the Earl of Glencairn until 1796, and is now the property of the Chief of Clan MacMillan.

In the late 14th century, King Robert II confirmed a grant of the lands of Finlaystone to Sir John de Danyelstoun. He was succeeded by his son, Sir Robert, who was keeper of Dumbarton Castle. When he died in 1399 his estates were divided between his daughters. Elizabeth inherited Newark Castle, while Margaret inherited Finlaystone. In 1405 Margaret married Sir William Cunningham, whose family held the estate as the seat of Clan Cunningham until the 19th century. William's grandson Alexander Lord Kilmaurs (1426–1488) was created Earl of Glencairn in 1488. The family were supporters of the Scottish Reformation, hosting the world's first Protestant Reformed communion service by the preacher John Knox in 1556.

The architect John Douglas was commissioned to design a new house in 1746, but building works were not carried out until 1764. The new house incorporated part of the 15th-century castle. In 1796, the 15th Earl of Glencairn Lord Kilmaurs, Chief of Clan Cunningham, died without issue, and Finlaystone passed to a cousin, Robert Graham of Gartmore, whose family took the name Cunningham-Graham. The Cunningham-Grahams sold Finlaystone in 1862 to Sir David Carrick-Buchanan, who in turn sold it in 1882 to George Jardine Kidston. Kidston commissioned the architect John James Burnet to carry out a Scots Baronial style remodelling of the house, completed in 1903. The grounds of the house were extended and planted during the early 20th century. Kidston's granddaughter Marian married General Sir Gordon MacMillan, Chieftain of the Clan MacMillan. Their son George Gordon MacMillan is the current chief and owner of Finlaystone. The estate is operated as a visitor attraction, with walks and play areas in the 4.0 ha gardens.

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Founded: 1764
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Derek Cowie (17 months ago)
Glorious grounds and lots of play equipment for the kids.
Al DarB (18 months ago)
Great place with friendly rangers. Farm club is fantastic for the kids and the Forrest walks are great for an escape
T McD (20 months ago)
Arrived and was surprised that you had to pay £5 per adult, decided to pay and enter and so glad I did. Such a beautiful park with lots to explore and do, the gardens are great and there are lots of stuff for the kids to do. Worth a look even if it does cost.
Christopher Fabvre (20 months ago)
We had a great time in the park! Really nice for a day out with kids. Great to see all the good slides & wooden structures built very well!
Christina Roberts (2 years ago)
Lovely grounds. Lots of walks and waterfalls. Kids playground looked a lot of fun but a bit too old for it now!
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