Either Lütold V von Regensberg or his son Ulrich established the fortified town of (Neu)-Regensberg around 1250. Ulrich died around 1280, and his son Lütold VIII had to sell Regensberg to Habsburg-Austria in 1302. The Habsburgs mortgaged the castle and town several times, and in 1407 the so-called Herrschaft Regensberg was acquired by the city of Zürich. From 1417 the castle became the seat of the bailiff of the bailiwick of Regensberg. On 6 June 1443 the council of Zürich forced their troops and the citizens to defend the fortified town, three days later the castle was conquered during the Old Zürich War by Zürich's contrahents, but not destroyed, and some months later manned again by Zürich troops.

On 9 September 1540 the town, but not the castle, was destroyed by fire, because it was separated from the Oberstadt by a ditch. The upper castle was rebuilt in the following year. From 1689 the castle and the upper town were fortified according to then modern standards. On 13 March 1798 the French revolutionary troops forced the council of the city republic of Zürich to abdicate, and the country bailiwicks were dissolved. After the end of the short-lived Helvetic Republic, Regensberg became the district capital, and the castle was the seat of the cantonal authorities, and in the main building there was the county jail until 1863.

Regensberg was designed as a fortified castle town and built by then modern contemporary criteria. The so-called upper castle (Oberburg) comprises a rectangular plaza as main square which is surrounded two rows of houses, and into the limestone a 57 m (187 ft) deep water well was carved. The lower castle (Unterburg) or lower town (Unterstadt) was probably built in the 14th century nestled at the castle's hill outside of the town wall. Therefore, it was not involved in the modernization of the upper castle in 1689.

Nowadays, the castle belongs to the Regensberg Castle Foundation. The round tower is still open to the public and offers a spectacular panoramic view of the surrounding region. In addition, information panels inside the tower relate the history of the small country town of Regensberg.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philippe Meyer (4 years ago)
Very nice medieval village
Helder Mendes (4 years ago)
It's not breathtaking but is a nice place to visit, good view, interesting houses, historical value.
Armine Ribi (5 years ago)
Lovely village and a great Gin bar! Definitely worth a visit!
Konstantinos Chaloulos (5 years ago)
Interesting/cute place with some nice views. It's not really much visited. Inside you'll find also a tower, on which you can go for the best views around. Some stone-walls and fountains bring a lot to the scenery. Time to spend: as usually, there's no upper limit on that. Min: 30-45' stroll should be enough. There's plenty of parking spaces nearby, close to the 3-streets crossing.
Karina Kjerulff Kotchiev (5 years ago)
The area around this old castle is so idyllic, romantic and beautiful. I would recommend visiting the castle. Going up the stairs and enjoying the spectacular view. In the summer time, they have a summer party up there with lots of activities for kids. You simply buy them a bracelet and they can try all kinds of funny activities. Easily spent 5-6 hours up there for the party. It is once a year around June. You can't drive your car up there though. During this festival there is a shuttle bus going up there. I just really love the atmosphere. I do not understand why they don't have a Christmas market up there. The setting is perfect!
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