The Lindenhof is a moraine hill and a public square in the historic center of Zürich. It is the site of the Roman and Carolingian era Kaiserpfalz around which the city has historically grown. The hilltop area includes prehistoric, Roman and medieval remains.

Prehistory

At the flat shore of Lake Zurich were Neolithic and Bronze Age (4500 to 850 BC) lakeside settlements. Lindenhof was largely surrounded by water and therefore an optimal location for early fortified settlements. Middle bronze age (1500 BC) artefacts and remains of a Celtic Oppidum from the 1st century BC (La Tène culture) have been found on excavations.

Roman Vicus

In 15 BC, Augustus's stepsons Drusus and Tiberius integrated the territory on the left side of Lake Zurich into the Roman provinces Raetia and Germania Superior. Several stone buildings from the Roman period were located on and around the hill. It was part of the small vicus Turicum, located on both sides of the Limmat and connected by a Roman bridge located near the present Rathausbrücke.

Turicum, Zurich's Roman name and possibly also its Celtic name, is engraved on a 2nd-century tombstone of a little boy. The tombstone is located in the Swiss National Museum; a copy is integrated in the Lindenhof wall at Pfalzgasse, leading to St. Peter church.

Using the topography, the Roman military built a citadel on top of the hill in the years of the Roman emperor Valentinian I (364–375), to defend migrations from the North by the Alamanni. It was 4500 square meters large, and it was fitted with 10 towers and two meter wide walls.

Medieval castle and graveyard

During the middle ages, the hilltop leveled fort became the retaining wall and gave the Lindenhof terrace a form similar to its current form. The remains of the Roman camp were used as the center of the later fortification of the historical center of Zürich. Significant parts of the lime mortar and ancient castle wall were integrated into the town houses around the Lindenhof and in a Kaiserpfalz (broken in 1218), which served as a place of festivities, including the engagement of the German emperor Henry IV with Bertha von Turin on Christmas in 1055. The Roman castle's remains existed until the early medieval age: a Carolingian, later Ottonian Pfalz (1054) was built on its remains. This Kaiserpfalz was a long building with a chapel on the eastern side of the fortified hill; it is last mentioned in 1172, and it was derelict by 1218, when its remains were scavenged for construction of the city walls and stone masonry on private houses.

In 1937, archaeologists found graves of late medieval children and adults that were oriented from the east to the west. In the year 1384, a chapel on the Lindenhof was mentioned, but no remains have been found.

Modern public park

Following the demolition of the former royal residence, the hill – the only public park within the city walls – became an area for public life and relaxation, with dense tree vegetation, stone tables, crossbow stands, and bowling and chess; the latter are still very popular in modern times.

The Hedwig fountain (1688) was sculpted by Duke Albrecht I. of Habsburg. It depicts the legend of the siege of Zurich in 1292 with a helmeted sculpture of the leader of the Zurich women. Under baroque influence, Lindenhof was converted in 1780 to a strictly geometrical park.

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Founded: 1500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Switzerland

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User Reviews

akash bansal (27 days ago)
Nice place at the heary of Zurich city center. Have been here during winters. the park was fully snow covered. Fantastic view of river and other side. You can plan to snack pack here. Waiting to go there in summers as well. Good place to be with kids and quite nice for couples as well.
Janipa Phl (3 months ago)
It was a great time to be there even corona situation but happy to see people walking around in Lindenhof hope we can come back to normal situation again. People there are enjoying in autumn season and nice weather in Zürich
Maite (4 months ago)
In here you will have the opportunity to enjoy a beautiful view even in Autumn! Take your selfies and all that but don't miss the chance to see the old men playing chess and other traditional games. :) It is very interesting and super cute.
Maite (4 months ago)
In here you will have the opportunity to enjoy a beautiful view even in Autumn! Take your selfies and all that but don't miss the chance to see the old men playing chess and other traditional games. :) It is very interesting and super cute.
Shailesh Kulkarni (5 months ago)
River side views are clear for pictures and its looking ideal always so you will always click the pics....nice to go around river... Also there are some good restaurants around so you can try that. People here generally interested in restaurants instead taking some snacks with them. Saturday and Sunday are the ideal days to roam around. Souvenir shops are around for shopping so you can not tired. No food available. You have to carry some snacks if you want spend some time here.
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The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

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