Uster Castle was built probably around 1200 by the House of Rapperswil. After the Appenzell wars Hans von Bonstetten concluded a pact with Zürich, and became a citizen of the city of Zürich respectively claimed the so-called Burgrecht in 1407. From that moment, the castle in time of war could be strengthened by a Zürich garrison. As an Austrian vassal, Zürich guaranteed a neutral status to the Bonstetten family, particularly during the Old Zürich War when the neighbouring town of Greifensee was besieged and destroyed by Old Swiss Confederacy marauders; the bodies of the defenders were buried at the Uster church.

In 1492 a fire destroyed the castle. The owners changed the following centuries many times. In 1852 the castle became the seat of the district administration, and the tower was used as a prison. In the same year the castle was rebuilt, again, and a restaurant opened. Since 1995 the castle houses the private boarding school, and the former restaurant Burg was rebuilt in a steakhouse in 2009.

From the first construction phase, the lower section of the tower, up to the level of the upper floor of the today's boarding school's building around the tower base, is preserved, but never was scientifically examined, as well as the surrounding area of the plateau. The core of the present tower measures about 11 metres.

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Schlossweg 1, Uster, Switzerland
See all sites in Uster

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dietrich Michael Weidmann (18 months ago)
Das Wahrzeichen von Uster trohnt hoch über der Stadt, erbaut vor über 900 Jahren von den Herren von Winterthur, direkte Vorfahren des Hauses von Habsburg. Am Sonntagnachmittag ist der Turm für Besucher geöffnet und bietet eine wunderschöne Aussicht über die Stadt auf die Alpen im Süden und bis zum Schwarzwald im Norden.
Renato Petrillo (18 months ago)
Schöne Lokation, Essen und Service ist gut
damian bertschi (19 months ago)
Dieses Schloss liegt erhöht auf einem Hügel in Uster. Aktuell ist dort eine Schule untergebracht. Dies ist ein sehr ruhiger Ort mit einer wunderbaren Aussicht uuf die Berge. Leicht unterhalb gibt es einen Bauerhof mit vielen unterschiedlichen Tieren, die sich frei bewegen können. Direkt anliegend gibt es zudem ein Restaurant, welches sich auf Fleischspezialitäten spezialisiert hat.
fitlinesa (20 months ago)
Sehr sehr schön
Diego Beglinger (4 years ago)
Great view from up there. Enjoy!
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