Točník Castle was built during the reign of Wenceslaus IV at the end of the 14th century above the already existing castle Žebrák as his private residence. The two castles, Točník and Žebrák, make up a pictoresque 'couple,' standing almost right next to each other.

The area where the castle stands was inhabited by people two thousand years ago, but it was not until the 14th century when the Bohemian and German king Wenceslaus IV decided to build his residence there. The castle Točník was built after the large fire in the castle Žebrák, which showed how unsafe it was for the king and how its position was not strategic.

The castle was built on a three-part ground plan. Behind the defensive wall is a massive moat with a bridge, which was originally protected by a gate tower. The most important building, situated in the residential section on the L-shaped ground plan, is the Royal Palace with its side wing. The second floor of the palace was taken up with a ceremonial hall, while other floors were residential.

During the Hussite wars, when Václav's brother Sigismund was in power, the castle was besieged by the Hussite army for three days, until it gave up and burnt down the towns Točník and Hořovice instead. The castle was then mortgaged and handed over from one person to another, but it never found an owner that would keep it for a longer time and so it was gradually reduced to ruins.

Jan of Watemberg initiated the first stage of the Renaissance alterations, which were continued by the Lobkowicz family. In 1594, the castle came once again to the royal property and was administrated by the Bohemian (Czech) Royal Chamber. The Thirty Years' War contributed greatly to the castle's deterioration. In 1923, the castle was sold to the Czech Association of Tourists for 2000 Czechoslovak crowns and now it belongs to the state. Since the 1930s the gradual restoration works continue until to this day.

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Točník, Czech Republic
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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Sevr (7 months ago)
Very interesting location for short walk. Check the website to find when it's open.
Kristina Boučková (11 months ago)
Perfect trip from Prague if you want to look into Middle Ages. A great Castle from the beginning of 15. century. prag-mit-kristina.webnode.cz
Michael Elin (14 months ago)
Nice views. About 1km walk uphill from parking.
debasis sutar (15 months ago)
Good trip for weekend.. wonderful nature around.. experience the old ruins of hrad and also the underground chilling rooms.. location was used for classic movies as well... Although entry fees is needed, highly recommend to go in...
Marcos Hoerlle (15 months ago)
Beautiful castle from the middle of the 13th century. The ruins of the castle are in good condition, being possible to visit some rooms. There is no guided tour, however when you buy the ticket you receive the explanation on a paper (available in English). You can leave the car on a parking place (50CZK) and walk around 1.5km till the castle. The ticket for adult cost 150 CZK.
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