Točník Castle was built during the reign of Wenceslaus IV at the end of the 14th century above the already existing castle Žebrák as his private residence. The two castles, Točník and Žebrák, make up a pictoresque 'couple,' standing almost right next to each other.

The area where the castle stands was inhabited by people two thousand years ago, but it was not until the 14th century when the Bohemian and German king Wenceslaus IV decided to build his residence there. The castle Točník was built after the large fire in the castle Žebrák, which showed how unsafe it was for the king and how its position was not strategic.

The castle was built on a three-part ground plan. Behind the defensive wall is a massive moat with a bridge, which was originally protected by a gate tower. The most important building, situated in the residential section on the L-shaped ground plan, is the Royal Palace with its side wing. The second floor of the palace was taken up with a ceremonial hall, while other floors were residential.

During the Hussite wars, when Václav's brother Sigismund was in power, the castle was besieged by the Hussite army for three days, until it gave up and burnt down the towns Točník and Hořovice instead. The castle was then mortgaged and handed over from one person to another, but it never found an owner that would keep it for a longer time and so it was gradually reduced to ruins.

Jan of Watemberg initiated the first stage of the Renaissance alterations, which were continued by the Lobkowicz family. In 1594, the castle came once again to the royal property and was administrated by the Bohemian (Czech) Royal Chamber. The Thirty Years' War contributed greatly to the castle's deterioration. In 1923, the castle was sold to the Czech Association of Tourists for 2000 Czechoslovak crowns and now it belongs to the state. Since the 1930s the gradual restoration works continue until to this day.

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Točník, Czech Republic
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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Czech Republic

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Hlaváčková (7 months ago)
Very nice walk, the castle in a good condition. Can recommend.
Láďa Svoboda (8 months ago)
Beautiful castle
Maksym Korolenko (12 months ago)
Old, nice for a single day trip
James Seddon (2 years ago)
Another Czech castle to visit set if beautiful woodlands that are perfect to walk in.
jaewan Sung (2 years ago)
Way to climb up to here was quite steep. Great nature surround by with many animals you might bump into. I could even see a boar digging ground. Bear cage is under the gate bridge. Castle was bigger than thought and easily hear bats communicating inside the castle
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