St Michael's Isle, popularly referred to as Fort Island, is noted for its attractive ruins. There is evidence for human activity on the island from the Mesolithic period onwards and there are two ancient buildings on the island. Both are in a state of ruin and closed to the public, though there are a number of walks which allow visitors to explore the surroundings.

St Michael's Chapel, a 12th-century chapel, is on the south side of the island. This Celtic-Norse chapel was built on the site of an older Celtic keeill.

The island is the site of two great battles for the control of the Isle of Man in 1250 and 1275, when England, Scotland and the Manx were fighting for control of the island. The Manx won the first battle, but 25 years later they lost control to Scotland.

Derby Fort, a 17th-century fort, is at the eastern end of the island. It was built by James Stanley, the 7th Earl of Derby and Lord of Mann in 1645, during the English Civil War, to protect the then busy port of Derbyhaven.

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Founded: 12th century
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en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Newman (9 months ago)
Very picturesque and some lovely views and ruins to see and explore.
geoffrey luff (12 months ago)
Not bad
Jack Eales (2 years ago)
Great spot for a brief adventure with the kids - ruins to explore and superb views of planes coming in to land
Kelly Graham (2 years ago)
I love this place it's lovely and quite and a great place to go and think or to picnic with friends. With history thrown in. Walking around you will most likely see seals swimming and lazing around on the on the rocks. Its definitely a place to and explore.
Stephen Devereau (2 years ago)
Scenic and peaceful site for the history buffs. Information well signposted.
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