St Michael's Isle

Derbyhaven, United Kingdom

St Michael's Isle, popularly referred to as Fort Island, is noted for its attractive ruins. There is evidence for human activity on the island from the Mesolithic period onwards and there are two ancient buildings on the island. Both are in a state of ruin and closed to the public, though there are a number of walks which allow visitors to explore the surroundings.

St Michael's Chapel, a 12th-century chapel, is on the south side of the island. This Celtic-Norse chapel was built on the site of an older Celtic keeill.

The island is the site of two great battles for the control of the Isle of Man in 1250 and 1275, when England, Scotland and the Manx were fighting for control of the island. The Manx won the first battle, but 25 years later they lost control to Scotland.

Derby Fort, a 17th-century fort, is at the eastern end of the island. It was built by James Stanley, the 7th Earl of Derby and Lord of Mann in 1645, during the English Civil War, to protect the then busy port of Derbyhaven.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Percival (10 months ago)
Beautiful and tranquil, the birdlife is wonderful, great place for bird and seal watching
Matthew Brooks (2 years ago)
A one way drive to get there with passing places on the way we'll worth a visit tremendous panoramic views
Gary Ramsden (5 years ago)
My wife and i loved it the history of the ruins is mind blowing. Extra treat was the seals in the bay we were the only ones around and ghey even swam towards us for a nosey 5 of them fab memory
Jason Newman (5 years ago)
Very picturesque and some lovely views and ruins to see and explore.
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