Just outside of Castletown, Balladoole is one of the Isle of Man’s most impressive ancient monuments.

Balladoole has been the site of many excavations that have revealed a number of significant finds including prehistoric flints, Bronze Age burials, Iron Age earthworks and early Christian lintel graves.

A Viking boat burial which dates back to between 850-950 AD was discovered in 1945 by a German refugee and a team from the internment camps based on the Island. The group were originally looking for an Iron Age hill fort but found the burial instead, lying within early Christian lintel graves, which contained a 36ft long Viking ship and the bodies of a man and woman.

In 1918, an ancient Keeill chapel dating between 900AD and 1000AD and a Bronze Age grave dating to 10000 BC were also discovered at the Balladoole site in an area now known as Chapel Hill. 

Information boards are provided next to each section of the site and for more information on the history of the site as well as dioramas of the burial and artifacts from the excavation, visit the Viking Gallery in the Manx Museum in Douglas. 

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Address

Castletown, United Kingdom
See all sites in Castletown

Details

Founded: 850-950 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.visitisleofman.com

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lily Stancliffe (10 months ago)
Beautiful spot
Michael Lawson (2 years ago)
Well worth the time to go to and see.
Robert Wallis (3 years ago)
This is a great Ancient Monument Site, with a Bronze Age burial a Viking ship burial and a early Christian religious site all set on a hill with fantastic views over the Bay ny Carrickey looking towards Port St Mary.
Life on The Isle of Man (3 years ago)
Amazing walks in a locum area could not recommended it more
Mark Kneen (4 years ago)
Fabulous hidden spot, great for just enjoying the views.
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