Just outside of Castletown, Balladoole is one of the Isle of Man’s most impressive ancient monuments.

Balladoole has been the site of many excavations that have revealed a number of significant finds including prehistoric flints, Bronze Age burials, Iron Age earthworks and early Christian lintel graves.

A Viking boat burial which dates back to between 850-950 AD was discovered in 1945 by a German refugee and a team from the internment camps based on the Island. The group were originally looking for an Iron Age hill fort but found the burial instead, lying within early Christian lintel graves, which contained a 36ft long Viking ship and the bodies of a man and woman.

In 1918, an ancient Keeill chapel dating between 900AD and 1000AD and a Bronze Age grave dating to 10000 BC were also discovered at the Balladoole site in an area now known as Chapel Hill. 

Information boards are provided next to each section of the site and for more information on the history of the site as well as dioramas of the burial and artifacts from the excavation, visit the Viking Gallery in the Manx Museum in Douglas. 

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Address

Castletown, United Kingdom
See all sites in Castletown

Details

Founded: 850-950 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

www.visitisleofman.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daz Aylward (DarrenA) (4 months ago)
Interesting iron age hill fort and Viking ship burial. A short walk from a small gate and lay-by for perhaps 3 cars.
Charles Sherran (11 months ago)
Lovely views
Robert Kneen (17 months ago)
Very haunting experience to imagine who lived there in the past. Great views over the South of the Island and never seen another person there. Easily accessible and within a few minutes of the sea... ? ??
Alex Smith (2 years ago)
Amazing historic site
Gary Clueit (2 years ago)
Interesting site with amazing panoramic views.
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