St. German's Cathedral Ruins

Peel, United Kingdom

The ruins located within the walls of Peel Castle are those of the former Cathedral of St German. Like the structures throughout the castle grounds, the cathedral's roof is completely missing. Robert Anderson examined the ruins to determine what repairs were required to restore the cathedral, and he reported to the island's Lieutenant Governor in 1877. However, none of the suggested repairs were carried out.

There is a pointed barrel-vaulted crypt below the chancel, measuring 10 × 5 × 3 metres, sloping to the entrance at the east. There is a cemetery in what was once the cathedral's nave.

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Peel, United Kingdom
See all sites in Peel

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Slater (5 months ago)
Outstanding got soul and body. Music and services of true cathedral standard.
Chris Sullivan (8 months ago)
Good venue for live music and community events. Steeped in history and a cultural must-see.
simeon newsham (9 months ago)
Been to few weddings and funerals seem good as far a church can be good
Ursula Neil (Little Bear) (16 months ago)
As we went in the organist was playing and it was lovely. We looked at the displays and saw how the church encourages young musicians, how lucky those youngsters are. The surroundings were worth exploring, so different from the usual graveyard experience. Well worth a visit which will be uplifting.
Maria dos Postais (2 years ago)
A little hidden, it's worth a visit. Initially a parish church, it replaced the old cathedral in the castle. The building is well kept and visits are free. Refreshments were available for whomever needed them, which I've never seen anywhere. We were free to roam the church and there was a lot of useful information.
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Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

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