St. Adamnan's Church

Douglas, United Kingdom

St Adamnan's Church is situated in an isolated position, surrounded by open farmland on the eastern coast of the island, between Groudle Glen and Baldrine. The eastern (and oldest) part of the church has been restored, but it is otherwise in a ruinous, though well-tended, condition. St Adamnan was the Abbot of Iona between 679 and 704.

The site on which the church stands is of ancient religious significance. The church yard contains Celtic crosses, the oldest of which dates backs to the 5th century AD - evidence of an early keeill. In about 1190, King Reginald of the Isle of Man gave a grant of the land of Escadala, in the Isle of Man to St Bees Priory, in Cumbria. It is likely that the site of the church was included in the grant, to which fact its subsequent reconstruction and selection as the parish church (despite its remoteness) are attributable.

On 25 June 1733, an Act of Tynwald was passed for the building of a new parish church at Boilley Veen, in a more convenient part of the parish, but the new church was not in fact completed.

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Address

Douglas, United Kingdom
See all sites in Douglas

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jack Eales (5 months ago)
Old semi derelict church, went exploring with the kids and found it.....
Ravina Talbot (12 months ago)
Celtic Cross is amazing
Ravina Talbot (12 months ago)
Celtic Cross is amazing
Louise McMahon (2 years ago)
This is a gorgeous little church, with a unique atmosphere
Louise McMahon (2 years ago)
This is a gorgeous little church, with a unique atmosphere
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