The castle of Freÿr with its gardens form one of the most magnificent natural sites in Belgium. It has been classified as one of Wallonia's major heritage sites.

Dating back to the Middle Ages, Freÿr was a keep given in fief by the Count of Namur to Jean de Rochefort Orjol in 1378. His granddaughter Marie married Jacques de Beaufort in 1410. Their descendants have kept the estate until the present. The keep was destroyed in 1554 by the French during the wars against Emperor Charles V. The oldest part of the current castle, the east wing, was built in 1571 and is one of the first examples of the 'Renaissance Mosane' style.

During the 17th century the house was enlarged by the addition of three wings, forming a square with the original wing. Around 1760 the south wing was pulled down and replaced by a wrought iron gate reminiscent of Jean Lamour's masterpiece in Nancy, closing the inner yard to give the castle its current appearance.

Interior

The castle is representative of the interior of a nobleman's summer residence of the 18th century. It features many original elements such as the impressive main hall with wall paintings by Frans Snyders and a ceiling covered by Louis XV frescoes, or the chapel with its Regency wooden panelling and its Baroque altar.

The rooms contain the ancient furniture of the Dukes of Beaufort-Spontin as well as traces of history left by royal guests (Louis XIV of France, Archduchess Maria-Christina, eldest child of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, King Stanislas I), and the living memory of 20 generations, among which is a delightful children's coach (18th century) that won the first prize at Paris World Exhibition (1889).

At Freÿr the Coffee Treaty or Treaty of Freÿr (1675) between France and Spain was signed, and the Treaty of the Borders between France and the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (1772) was negotiated. At this time Louis XIV stayed here as the guest of Jeanne d'Harscamp, Dowager Duchess of Beaufort-Spontin.

The gardens

Designed in the style of André Le Nôtre in 1760 by Canon Guillaume de Beaufort-Spontin and enlarged by his brother Philippe in 1770, the gardens are set on walled terraces on the left bank of the Meuse. They offer views towards the woods to the north and towards the Meuse to the east, and their peace and serenity contrast with the naked rockface on the far bank.

Ponds and fountains babble on the lower level where orange trees spread their delicate perfume. Most of them are 350 years old. The trees came to Freÿr in the first part of the 18th century from Lunéville, the residence of the Duke of Lorraine. They are the oldest trees in cases in Europe. The wooden cases are still built according to the original design. The oldest orangery of the Low Countries (early 18th century) combines elegance and simplicity.

The upper level is covered by hedge mazes (6 km) that unveil their mysteries one by one: a set of patterns inspired by card game figures, a theme also present in the terra cotta statues made by Cyfflé.

At the very top of the gardens, the Rococo pavilion commands the view on the Meuse and seduces by its delicate stucco decoration, based on the theme of fertility with cornucopia and Tritons.

The right bank of the Meuse is dominated by cliffs (more than 100 m high), from which one has an exceptional view of the estate.

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Address

Freyr 12, Hastière, Belgium
See all sites in Hastière

Details

Founded: 1571
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

More Information

www.freyr.be
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Aerts (11 months ago)
Nice for a visit. Expect less then 2 hours garden + indoor. So maybe better in combo with another activity
Deniz Evyapan (11 months ago)
It’s very well preserved Castle. Full of history and great collections of items from the era represented. 1 or max 1,5 hours is good enough to enjoy the castle and its beautiful gardens!
Angelo Blasutta (14 months ago)
Nice castle in a very nice context. Unpleasant reception, castle visit denied 1 hour before the closure. Visited just the gardens that's nothing special at all.
Sylvia TAY (14 months ago)
Privately owned castle located next to the Meuse River. Self guided walk through the castle and gardens. Period furnishings and lots of paintings of the owners' ancestors. Interesting visit to include in your Dinant itinerary.
seppe G (16 months ago)
Beautyful castle and garden. Calming to stroll around. Dogs are also welcome in the gardens.
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