Falsterbohus Castle Ruins

Skanör-Falsterbo, Sweden

Falsterbohus was the name of a number of historic castles made by Danish dating from the mid-1200s. The first castle was destroyed in 1311, when Hanseatic League attacked against Eric VI of Denmark. The second one was also destroyed in a battle only couple of years later, at this time by Swedish soldiers.

The castle was rebuilt again in the late 14th century as the residence of king’s bailiff. The market of Scania was also moved from Skanör to Falsterbo at this time. The bailiff’s house was moved to Malmö in the 15th century and the stategic value of Falsterbo decreased quickly. The castle was demolished already in 1596.

Today there are only castle foundations remaining. The building now known as Falsterbohus was built in 1908 as a hotel and casion and today it functions as a condominium.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olga Sherenkovska (7 months ago)
Я таких замков ещё в жизни не видела! Эмоции невероятные!
Karin Ulla Elisabeth Grönqvist (9 months ago)
The castle ruins and above all the moats have unfortunately fallen down.
Volker Overesch (11 months ago)
Very nice path, passable by bike along the castle ruins to the beach with cute bathing houses .... nice evening bike tour
Otto Mörner (11 months ago)
Cool place
Michael Pold (2 years ago)
A small ruin is left as well as traces of the double moat.
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