Srebrna Góra Fortress

Srebrna Góra, Poland

Srebrna Góra Fortress was constructed in 1765–1777 when the territory was part of the Kingdom of Prussia. The fort is one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments and has been declared a rare example of a surviving European 18th century mountain stronghold.

The fortress in Srebrna Góra was built by the order of Frederick II, the King of Prussia. It was designed by Prussian architect Ludwig Wilhelm Regeler, aided by a number of Prussian military engineers. Minor additional works took place in the following years, but no major alterations were made; construction of a nearby flanked fort was begun but was quickly abandoned. The complex is composed of six forts, several bastions, and associated elements. The main fort of the complex is the central Donżon Fort on the Warowna Góra hill.

The complex is located on the heights of the Sudety Mountains, a body which forms a natural border between the Kłodzko Valley and the Silesian Lowlands. It controls the passage through the Silver Valley (Przełęcz Srebrna or Silberbergpass). The fort could shelter a garrison of 4000 soldiers, supplied to survive a year-long siege. It was defended by 264 artillery pieces. The fortress was intended to guard a route linking Prussian territories with Bohemian lands in the south, and thus help repel any possible incursions from Austria.

The fortress was never captured by the enemy while besieged. On 28 June 1807 it successfully resisted a siege by Napoleonic forces during the War of the Fourth Coalition; this was the only time the fortress was the site of an active battle. By 1860 it was declared obsolete and the garrison reduced in size; it was abandoned as an active military stronghold in 1867. The fortress has survived till modern day with relatively little modernization or damage, contributing to its valuable status as a historical monument of its era. It served as a military training grounds, and by the end of the 19th century was already a tourist attraction, with a restaurant opened in the fort by 1885.

During World War II the fortress was used as a prison for Polish officers imprisoned by the Germans. In 1973 a military museum was opened in the Fort.

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Details

Founded: 1765–1777
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
forty.pl

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maciej K (30 days ago)
The citadel was built in 12 years and it's the biggest of this kind in Europe. The musket shot done by a guide was really amazing! However a tour might be a bit longer.
muniolinio (43 days ago)
Very interesting place but you need to take the tour because you can't walk around by yourself in a lot of places, so need go with tour, you need park 1km from fort and walk up , easy walk 20min or take and pay for meleks ( little bus) but is easy walk
Eric M (2 months ago)
Very nice place with history. Folder and panels in several languages give relevant information. Landscape is beautiful. Unfortunately guided tour is only available in Polish. Nice to see anyway.
Magdalena Lisowska (4 months ago)
You can visit it by yourself, but i recommend comming there when free tour guide is available. They tell you the stories about soldiers life, duties, penalties in a way that you can feel their misery....
Povilas Čeb (14 months ago)
This place is really amazing, I liked how well it was restored and views from this fortress are very nice. Guide was wearing authentic clothes and the most impressive thing during tour was shooting from a old gun. Although what I didn't really like was that there were no translations to English language on any kind of place, maybe that's because this place isn't visited a lot by other nationality tourists?! I don't know... But as this fortress claims to be one of the biggest in Europe I think it should have quite a lot more translations.
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