Frauenfeld castle was founded by the counts of Kyburg in the 13th century. The massive tower dates from 1227.

The exhibit of the Thurgau History Museum in castle illustrates the time after 1415 that was so important for the region. It offers both children and adults an insightful and playful gateway to the Middle Ages. The modern arrangements, interactive animation and the artwork shining in new splendour are the highlights of the multimedia castle tour. 

The expressive presentation of the rooms offers the visitors a close look at how the people experienced the turbulent transition to the government of the Swiss confederacy, a time fraught with conflict, when modern boundaries were drawn.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Ackerknecht (13 months ago)
exciting for young and old. Great view at the top of the tower.
Michael Meier (13 months ago)
Bit of a small museum. Nicely designed rooms and preparation of information. A lot of religious and political history, however. Little about life back then, knights, battles, etc. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to touch any objects. Therefore not entirely suitable for children.
Avelino Jara Vera (14 months ago)
Historic places that are worth visiting.
Thomas Hanne (16 months ago)
Eher unspektakuläres historisches Museum.
Roberta Cavadini (17 months ago)
Nice, interesting, free
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