Älvsborg Castle

Gothenburg, Sweden

Älvsborg, also Elfsborg Fortress, is a sea fortress situated on the mouth of the Göta Älv river. It served to protect Sweden's access to the Atlantic Ocean and the nearby settlement of today's Gothenburg and its four predecessors. The fortress was relocated in the 17th century, this New Älvsborg Fortress is still maintained. Of the Old Älvsborg Fortress, only few ruins are visible today in the vicinity of the Carnegie-pier. The new fortress was founded in 1621 by Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden.

In 1643, a settlement in New Sweden, North America, was named Fort Nya Elfsborg, after the Swedish fortress. This settlement was however abandoned in 1655.

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Details

Founded: 1621
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacques Frinchaboy (7 months ago)
Nice place, read all about it but now July 20th 2018, the company that owned the water taxi service has gone bankrupt and there is no regular way to get there without hiring a boat. So what would be a 4 or 5 star place has only received one star.
Eva Fab (8 months ago)
Volvo Ocean Race - yes!
Kyle (2 years ago)
It was a small place to visit. Quick tour. I find it interesting how everyone that was there wasn't from this country and spoke English yet the tour wasn't acted out in English? We just went off on our own and enjoyed some ice cream.
Alesiya Hegay (2 years ago)
Place where you can learn more history about fortress life and become a part of the place while spending time at the calm atmosphere. Enjoyable view, nice food at the small Cafe and lots of places for picnic and even taking a cat nap
Michał Zajączkowski (2 years ago)
The small castle on the island with very nice views of river and sea. In old building is restaurant where you can find quite tasty food. Sometimes you can meet soldier from XVIII century.
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