City Church of Bremgarten

Bremgarten, Switzerland

The City Church of Bremgarten is an important landmark. The church was built in 1300 and was consecrated in honor of Saint Mary Magdalene. In 1420 Anna of Brunswick-Lüneburg, the wife of Frederick IV, Duke of Austria, gave all rights to the church to the local hospital, under the condition that a mass in her memory would be served once per year. The mass is still being served. In 1529, in the course of the Reformation, the building was converted into a Protestant church, but in 1532 it became Catholic again, Since 1532, the church has been consecrated in honor of Saint Nicholas.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

arda skill (18 months ago)
Lugar tranquilo y acogedor
Maria Staub (18 months ago)
Die Kirch ist wunderschön.Bremgarten ist eine Reise in die Vergangenheit. Wunderbar.
Hans-Peter Eckstein (19 months ago)
Schöne Kirche mit toller Akustik und eine Gemeinde, die ein reichhaltiges kulturelles Programm für Bremgarten und Umgebung anzubieten weiss.
Thomas Fuchser (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne für meine Verhältnisse prunkvolle Kirche. Aus fotografischer Sicht verstehe ich die Idee des Architekten nicht weshalb nicht auf die Symmetrie geachtet wurde. Das aber ermöglicht auf der andern Seite wiederum spezielle Fotos die nicht jeder zu bieten hat.
Nando Heinz (2 years ago)
Lugar histórico para visitar desde ca. s12 arte religioso. Se incendió hace unos años atrás (creo 1984) pero ya está restaurada. Imponente con su torre de techo rojo
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