Teatro Bibiena

Mantua, Italy

Constructed for the Royal Virgilian Academy of Science and Arts (Accademia Virgiliana), the Teatro Bibiena di Mantova was designed in late Baroque or early Rococo style by Antonio Galli Bibiena and erected between 1767 and 1769. With a bell-shaped floorplan and four rows of boxes, it followed the new style of theatres then in vogue. It was intended to host both theatre productions and concerts, and scientific discourses and conventions. Bibiena also provided the monochrome frescoes in the interior. The theatre is now considered to be his most important work.

It was opened officially on 3 December 1769. A few weeks later, on 16 January 1770, thirteen-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart played a concert here, with resounding success.

In 1773, Giuseppe Piermarini, who constructed the neighbouring palazzo for the Accademia Virgiliana, designed and built the façade of the theatre.

Still used for its original purposes, it now can also be visited by tourists as one of Mantua's museums. The theatre is relatively small, with a scene 12,3 metres wide and 5,6 metres deep, and a maximum audience of 363 persons.

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    Details

    Founded: 1767
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Luna Yen (18 months ago)
    Little bit small, but is good!!
    Massimo Pizzichella (19 months ago)
    Magical little theatre, it still echoes Mozart early performance.
    Andrea Spallanzani (19 months ago)
    What a gem! So beautiful, a must visit while in Mantova
    Joasia Tobiasiewicz (22 months ago)
    Extraordinary small theatre with amazing interior design and excellent acoustic. Am looking forward to attending a concert.
    Helen Arcaro (2 years ago)
    Calm, quiet, only €2. I would love to see some theatre here.
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