Teatro Bibiena

Mantua, Italy

Constructed for the Royal Virgilian Academy of Science and Arts (Accademia Virgiliana), the Teatro Bibiena di Mantova was designed in late Baroque or early Rococo style by Antonio Galli Bibiena and erected between 1767 and 1769. With a bell-shaped floorplan and four rows of boxes, it followed the new style of theatres then in vogue. It was intended to host both theatre productions and concerts, and scientific discourses and conventions. Bibiena also provided the monochrome frescoes in the interior. The theatre is now considered to be his most important work.

It was opened officially on 3 December 1769. A few weeks later, on 16 January 1770, thirteen-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart played a concert here, with resounding success.

In 1773, Giuseppe Piermarini, who constructed the neighbouring palazzo for the Accademia Virgiliana, designed and built the façade of the theatre.

Still used for its original purposes, it now can also be visited by tourists as one of Mantua's museums. The theatre is relatively small, with a scene 12,3 metres wide and 5,6 metres deep, and a maximum audience of 363 persons.

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    Founded: 1767
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    User Reviews

    Milan Jovanović (9 months ago)
    Magnificent theatar!
    Igor Petriček (17 months ago)
    Nice small theatre with Mozart connection.
    Luca Pellegrini (20 months ago)
    I am biased, but this is definitely one of the most beautiful ancient theaters in the world!!
    Haris Aslanidis (2 years ago)
    It blows your mind! Many famous musicians wanted to perform in this theater back in time and I guess also on the modern days. Imagine how can an artist feel playing in a Teatro like that...!
    Russell Burford (2 years ago)
    The theatre is a good test for the engineering marvel of times pasted .. the orchestra that play on the 15-09-2019 performed and sounded Excellent .. very enjoyable evening ... Many Thanks ..
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