Viboldone Abbey

Viboldone, Italy

The Abbey of Viboldone was founded in 1176 and completed in 1348 by the Humiliati, an order of monks, nuns and lay people who worked in the abbey producing wool cloths and cultivated the nearby fields with innovative techniques.

After the suppression of the Humiliati by Pope Pius V (1571), the abbey went to the Olivetan Benedictines, who were forced to leave the abbey in 1773, when Lombardy fell in Austrian hands. After several years of abandonment, the abbey is currently home to the Community of Madre Margherita Marchi (Benedictine nuns) since 1941.

The façade (finished in 1348) is hut-shaped, with mullioned windows and visible brickwork with white stone decorations, and divided into three sectors by two semi-columns. The entrance portal is in white marble, and is surmounted by a lunette with marble sculptures of the 'Madonna with Child between the Saints Ambrose and John of Meda'. At its sides, two Gothic niches houses statues of the Sts. Peter and Paul. The door is in dark wood, and dates to the 14th century.

The bell tower has an appearance similar to that of the façade, with frames in cotto and small arcades at the bases of the double and triple mullioned windows. The latter are surmounted by small circular windows.

The interior is rather sober, with few decorations, aside from the extensive fresco decoration of the Giottesque school. It has a rectangular hall plan, with a nave and two aisles with five spans each (the first ones in Romanesque style, while the remaining ones are Gothic with cotto columns and high cross vaults). The arches are ogival.

The fresco decoration includes the Madonna in Maestà with Saints and the large Universal Judgement with, in the middle, Jesus and at his left the Damned, overlook by Satan. Other frescoes, depicting Renaissance musical instruments, are housed in the Music Hall, located in a building annexed to the church.

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Details

Founded: 1176
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Grech (8 months ago)
Peaceful place of worship
roberto tamborra (9 months ago)
A beautiful small Jewel to discover in Milan suburbs.
Stella Booth (2 years ago)
A lovely stroll from San Giuliano Milanese to the Abbey. Very green and shady. Not crowded, so quiet and pleasant. I went under the station underpass to get there. No public conveniences nor bars along the way but plenty on returning to San Giuliano Milanese.
Stella Gnaga (2 years ago)
A Green quiet walk or stroll on a Sunday morning before it gets too hot. It's a bit sad to see so many structures boarded up and crumbling down. But well worth a visit, especially if you are interested in farm buildings from passed generations, or if you enjoy a quiet, peaceful stroll.
Stella (Nonnq S) (2 years ago)
A Green quiet walk or stroll on a Sunday morning before it gets too hot. It's a bit sad to see so many structures boarded up and crumbling down. But well worth a visit, especially if you are interested in farm buildings from passed generations, or if you enjoy a quiet, peaceful stroll.
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