San Babila Church

Milan, Italy

San Babila was once considered the third most important in the city after the Duomo and the Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio. It is dedicated to saint Babylas of Antioch.

At the beginning of the 5th century, Marolus, the bishop of Milan, brought from Antioch to Milan relics of saints Babylas of Antioch and Romanus of Caesarea. Marolus founded the Basilica Concilia Sanctorum or church of San Romano, which stood until the 19th century, a few meters south of the church of San Babila, on the site of a Roman temple dedicated to the Sun.

The church of San Babila was built on the same site in about 1095. In the 16th century, the church was extended with an additional construction at the front and a new baroque façade. The church still retains its original medieval fabric, although much was lost due to baroque and modern renovations.

The whole complex was renovated in the 19th century with the intent of restoring the appearance of the medieval basilica, and in the early 20th century the Neo-Romanesque façade by Paolo Cesa-Bianchi was built. The bell tower is from 1920, and replaced the original tower which fell down in the 16th century.

The interior has a nave and two aisles. There are two side chapels that date from the late Renaissance. The right aisle has an image of the Madonna which is highly venerated by the Milanese population.

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Address

Corso Monforte 1, Milan, Italy
See all sites in Milan

Details

Founded: 1095
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alan Greep (6 months ago)
Spoilt by the major works going on
Shailesh Kumar (6 months ago)
nice place to hangout
Hleb Makarevich (9 months ago)
Great place in Milano. Beware of scammers here!
Dominic Majendie (11 months ago)
This is my regular mass when in Milan. I have never managed to get into the Duomo except as a tourist. This is a quiet close alternative with a quick 8.00am mass.
David M (13 months ago)
In the center of city, looks nice
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