Cales Coves Necropolis

Illes Balears, Spain

Cales Coves is an emblematic and spectacular prehistoric necropolis, both for its setting and for the large number of tombs in it. They take the form of a set of cavities excavated from the rock walls of the ravines and coastal cliff faces (about 90 altogether), used by local communities to bury their dead. Several types of cave have been documented. The necropolis was used for about 1000 years, from the 11th century BCE up until the Romans took control.

In the Roman era, despite no longer being in use as a necropolis, a series of inscriptions on the cave walls testify to their use as a place of pilgrimage, as can be seen in the famous Cova deis Jurats. Calescoves was also a major anchorage port, especially between the 4th century B.C. and the 6th century A.D., with ships arriving from powerful trading nations along the Mediterranean coast.

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Details

Founded: 11th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Warren (15 months ago)
Beautiful place to walk. So worth it
Terry Bartlett (18 months ago)
Beautiful place, if you have a car, its a must
Francis Munson (19 months ago)
Very good place to walk to. scenic
Mike Smart (2 years ago)
Beautiful but not a place for sunbathing apart from the boat ramp. Worth the walk from Calais En Porter. Seemed good for snorkeling. Archeology being carried out in October in the bay.
Charlie Bennett (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, quiet and very relaxing. Definitely recommend taking some food or at least having some breakfast before tackling the walks. One of my favourite spots in Menorca
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