Cales Coves Necropolis

Illes Balears, Spain

Cales Coves is an emblematic and spectacular prehistoric necropolis, both for its setting and for the large number of tombs in it. They take the form of a set of cavities excavated from the rock walls of the ravines and coastal cliff faces (about 90 altogether), used by local communities to bury their dead. Several types of cave have been documented. The necropolis was used for about 1000 years, from the 11th century BCE up until the Romans took control.

In the Roman era, despite no longer being in use as a necropolis, a series of inscriptions on the cave walls testify to their use as a place of pilgrimage, as can be seen in the famous Cova deis Jurats. Calescoves was also a major anchorage port, especially between the 4th century B.C. and the 6th century A.D., with ships arriving from powerful trading nations along the Mediterranean coast.

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Details

Founded: 11th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Henriksson (2 months ago)
Interasting with all the old graves.
Annie Edwards (4 months ago)
Real finding neverland vibes. Stumbled into the nudist corner and then a fedora-wearing guitar player popped onto a rock. Excellent flamenco cords. A very attractive kayaker even came to watch. No sand , just vibes. Initially thrown off by the wood chips in place of sand but climb rocks and you’re chilling. Kicking rocks is not a good idea. Maybe bring a pillow for ur bum. Enjoy.
Rachael Smith (15 months ago)
Beautiful spot
Rachael Smith (15 months ago)
Beautiful spot
Tiago Schiappa (2 years ago)
I have no words to describe this amazing place!! Was much better than what i was expecting... I would go there any time and every year
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