The settlement of Cala Morell is a Menorcan pretalayotic archaeological site situated on a 35-meter-high coastal headland which closes the northeast side of Cala Morell's bay. This promontory is protected by a dry-stone wall, which is found in the area where the promontory connects to solid ground. Radiocarbon dating of the site offers an approximate chronology of its occupation between 1600 and 1200 BC.

Around twelve Bronze Age dwelling navetes can be seen throughout the site. There is also an indeterminate 4-meter diameter circular structure built with large stone slabs which was put up on the promontory's highest part. There are two large hollows which were cut through the bedrock towards the settlement's central area, which could have been used to collect rainwater. All the structures within the settlement are enclosed by a dry-stone wall which closes access to the promontory from solid ground. In the side of the promontory which faces the sea there are no remains of defensive structures, since the rocks are high and sheer enough, forming a natural defence.

During the past few years two dwelling navetas and the circular construction erected on the highest part of the settlement have been excavated. Both navetas are oriented to the south and are domestic units which abut the outer wall. Inside these navetas there are benches surrounding a hearth. There is a grinding stone base and a clay structure outside naveta 11 and facing its façade, and both elements are most likely related to food preparation (cereal grinding). Naveta 12 does not have this type of elements related to it, although it has two small stretches of wall that close its entrance.

All the evidence, including the structures, the recovered artifacts (pottery, bone tools such as awls and spatulas, grinding stones, etc) and the huge quantity of domesticated animal bones (goats, sheep, pigs and, above all, cow) ) suggest that the function of these navetas was domestic. Moreover, the complete absence of marine animals (fish, mollusks, crustaceans, etc.) seems to indicate that the inhabitants of this place, despite living by the sea, did not consume or use marine resources. This fact, even though it can seem surprising, is something attested in all sites dating to the Prehistory of the island.

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Founded: 1600-1200 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Sergey L. (3 years ago)
Interesting. Worth to visit!
Betina Alex (3 years ago)
Exploring the caves was fun. with a short trek you can reach the top of the hill, the view from here is pretty amazing.
Lisa Smidt (3 years ago)
Cala Morell is an exquisite little village in the north of Menorca. The necropolis is well marked and different to the other necròpolis' located on the island. I was there in fall/winter. Everything is closed, no supermarkets or bars open. It is on the camí de cavalls, which passes through. Nice rugged coast, and summer offers a "chill out" on the coast line.
Jamie Hay (3 years ago)
Interesting place to potter round for an hour so. A number of burial chambers carved into the hillsides. A few different features to look out for. Signage gives some good background.
Steve Mann (4 years ago)
Interesting network of caves at Cala Morello, where many bones, pots and other artefacts relating to the burial of people going back to the bronze age have been uncovered. In truth not much to see except the caves themselves but there are information boards which help to shed light on what they were for and why they are there. History buffs will enjoy.
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