Trebalúger Talayot

Es Castell, Spain

A Talayotic period settlement (1000-700 B.C.) in Trebalúger was a spectacularly large talaiyot; it is 28 metres in diameter at its widest point. It has an elliptical layout and was built on a high rocky outcrop on the site of an earlier structure from the Naviforme period dating from 1350 B.C., with the bases of the pillars still preserved inside. At the front of the monument, near the entrance, you can see the remains of a ramp that led up to the top of the talaiyot. Around the outside you can see the walls of a polygonal structure, also from the Talayotic period, which has been damaged by the lime kiln built over it at a later date.

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Details

Founded: 1000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kim Attard (3 years ago)
Always awesome
Eduardo Cifuentes (3 years ago)
Bonic per veure
Pasquale Agnese (3 years ago)
Lindo pueblo se yo tenia Dinero me compreria un chalet en trebaluger tranquillo seguro
Susan Jones (4 years ago)
Interesting but a ruin
javier hernandez nieto (4 years ago)
Un poco apartado.
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