Trepucó Talayotic Settlement

Mahón, Spain

The settlement of Trepucó is one of the largest on Menorca, covering an area of around 49,240 square metres. Today, only a small part of the site can still be seen, the two oldest buildings, the talaiots (1000-700 BCE). Other remains include parts of the wall, two square towers on the west wall, the taula enclosure and traces of dwellings from the post-Talayotic period (650-123 BCE).The taula enclosure is one of the biggest on the island, despite having been subjected to what, by today’s standards, would be considered clumsy restoration work. This is one of the sites excavated around 1930 by Margaret Murray, a British archaeologist who was a pioneer of scientific research on Prehistoric Menorca.

The houses are perfectly visible on the west side of the settlement, due to excavation work carried out several years ago. They are multi-lobed with a central patio area and several rooms arranged around the outside. Looking at the settlement, it is easy to see that there was a clear division between the communal area (between the large talaiot and the taula) and the domestic area.The houses near the smaller talaiot seem to have been abandoned at short notice, meaning that the archaeological dig uncovered exceptionally well-preserved domestic implements, now on display in the Museum of Menorca.The larger talayot and the taula stand at the centre of a star-shaped fortification built during the 18th century.

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Details

Founded: 1000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Baciu (10 months ago)
Lovely
Marcin (10 months ago)
Amazing site and free access. Recommended.
Mariusz Kraj (11 months ago)
Amazing place, give you a perspective :-)
Pere Viader (2 years ago)
Well conserved and very descriptive
Bob Smith (3 years ago)
Interesting site and good access.
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