Torre dello Ziro

Amalfi, Italy

Torre dello Ziro tower was built in 1480 by the Duke of Amalfi, Antonio Piccolomini, during a time of plaguing attacks by the Saracens. Constructed along with a fortress to provide protection and advance warning, the round stone lookout enjoys splendid views of the Gulf of Salerno and the villages scattered around the hills and on the seafront.

It is said that the Duchess of Amalfi, Giovanni d'Aragon, was locked up in the tower with her two sons and eventually murdered here for her scandalous affair with the butler. Some say they can hear her crying as they pass the appealing ruins.

To reach the Torre dello Ziro, you have to go for a walk. Start in the village of Pontone, below Scala and follow the signs toward Atrani down the staircases and pathways. You'll then find signs directing you to the Torre. Along the way you'll get to see the splendid Villa Cimbrone in Ravello and other lovely scenes. The tower itself is basks in the sun, despite its dark legendary past, overlooking the sapphire waters and pastel colors of Atrani and Amalfi below.

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Founded: 1480
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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